Streak Hall of Fame
38

Magorzatau4

Malgosia

150033 XP#152107 341.
1368#36123
0

Learning English from Polish

Level 1 · 0 XP
0/60 XP · 0% complete · 60 XP to next level

Crowns: 0/730
0% complete · 458 sessions to L1 tree

Skills: /121+2
2% complete

Lessons: 0/458+0/4
0% complete
! !
Lexemes: 0/2864+0/30
You discovered 0% of available words/lexemes
?
Strength: 0%
0000121

Created: 2014-09-22
Daily Goal: 20 XP
Last update: 2021-11-20 00:17:42 GMT+3


48192209

XP per Skill (2 weeks)raw

Skills by StrengthCrownsDateNameOriginal Order

  • 1670052469
    0.000Basics 110012 +3 lessons +19 lexemes0/3 ••• Learn Test out
    Frau · Junge · Kind · Mann · a · am · an · and · apple · bin · bist · boy · bread · drink · drinks · du · eat · eats · ein · eine · girl · he · i · ich · is · man · she · the · water · woman
    30 words

    Welcome to German :)

    Welcome to the German course! We will provide you with tips and notes throughout the course. However, be aware that these are optional. Only read them when you feel stuck, or when you are interested in the details. You can use the course without them.

    Often, it's best to just dive into the practice. See how it goes! You can always revisit the Notes section later on.

    Capitalizing nouns

    In German, all nouns are capitalized. For example, "my name" is mein Name, and "the apple" is der Apfel. This helps you identify which words are the nouns in a sentence.

    German genders are strange

    Nouns in German are either feminine, masculine or neuter. For example, Frau (woman) is feminine, Mann (man) is masculine, and Kind (child) is neuter.

    While some nouns (Frau, Mann, …) have natural gender like in English (a woman is female, a man is male), most nouns have grammatical gender (depends on word ending, or seemingly random).

    For example, Mädchen (girl) is neuter, because all words ending in -chen are neuter. Wasser (water) is neuter, but Cola is feminine, and Saft (juice) is masculine.

    It is important to learn every noun along with its gender because parts of German sentences change depending on the gender of their nouns.

    For now, just remember that the indefinite article (a/an) ein is used for masculine and neuter nouns, and eine is used for feminine nouns. Stay with us to find out how "cases" will later modify these.

    gender indefinite article
    masculine ein Mann
    neuter ein Mädchen
    feminine eine Frau

    Verb conjugations

    Conjugating regular verbs

    Verb conjugation in German is more complex than in English. To conjugate a regular verb in the present tense, identify the stem of the verb and add the ending corresponding to any of the grammatical persons, which you can simply memorize. For now, here are the singular forms:

    Example: trinken (to drink)

    English person ending German example
    I -e ich trinke
    you (singular informal) -st du trinkst
    he/she/it -t er/sie/es trinkt

    Conjugations of the verb sein (to be)

    Like in English, sein (to be) is completely irregular, and its conjugations simply need to be memorized. Again, you will learn the plural forms soon.

    English German
    I am ich bin
    you (singular informal) are du bist
    he/she/it is er/sie/es ist

    Umlauts

    Umlauts are letters (more specifically vowels) that have two dots above them and appear in some German words like Mädchen.

    Literally, "Umlaut" means "around the sound," because its function is to change how the vowel sounds.

    no umlaut umlaut
    a ä
    o ö
    u ü

    An umlaut change may change the meaning. That's why it's important not to ignore those little dots.

    If you can't type these, a workaround is to type "oe" instead of "ö", for example.

    No continuous aspect

    In German, there's no continuous aspect. There are no separate forms for "I drink" and "I am drinking". There's only one form: Ich trinke.

    There's no such thing as Ich bin trinke or Ich bin trinken!

    When translating into English, how can I tell whether to use the simple (I drink) or the continuous form (I am drinking)?

    Unless the context suggests otherwise, either form should be accepted.

  • 1670052469
    0.000The10021 +1 lesson +3 lexemes0/1 •••
    das · der · die
    3 words

    Definite articles

    As mentioned in Basics 1, German nouns have one of three genders: feminine, masculine or neuter.

    While they sometimes correspond to a natural gender ("der Mann" is male), most often the gender will depend on the word, not on the object it describes. For example, the word "das Mädchen" (the girl) ends in "-chen", hence it is neuter. This is called grammatical gender.

    Each gender has its own definite article. Der is used for masculine nouns, das for neuter, and die for feminine. Later in this course you will learn that these might be modified according to "case".

    gender definite (the) indefinite (a/an)
    masculine der Mann ein Mann
    neuter das Mädchen ein Mädchen
    feminine die Frau eine Frau

    Conjugating verbs

    Here are the conjugation tables from "Basics 1" (where you can find a more detailed explanation) again.

    trinken (to drink)

    English person ending German example
    I -e ich trinke
    you (singular informal) -st du trinkst
    he/she/it -t er/sie/es trinkt

    sein (to be)

    English German
    I am ich bin
    you (singular informal) are du bist
    he/she/it is er/sie/es ist

    Generic vs. specific (German is not Spanish or French)

    Just like in English, using or dropping the definite article makes the difference between specific and generic.

    I like bread = Ich mag Brot (bread in general)

    I like the bread = Ich mag das Brot (specific bread)

    A good general rule is to use an article when you would use one in English. If there is none in English, don't use one in German.

    There are some slight differences when using a few abstract nouns, but we'll see about that later.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Basics 210031 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    Frauen · Jungen · Männer · are · book · boys · child · children · das · die · girls · has · ihr · men · menu · milk · newspaper · read · reads · rice · sandwich · seid · sie · sind · they · we · wir · women
    28 words

    German plurals are also strange :)

    In English, making plurals out of singular nouns is typically as straightforward as adding -(e)s at the end of the word. In German, the transformation is more complex. You will learn details about this in a later lesson.

    In some languages (such as French or Spanish), genders are also differentiated in the plural. In German, the plural form does not depend on what gender the singular form is.

    Regardless of grammatical gender, all plural nouns take the definite article die (You will later learn how "cases" can modify this). This does not make them feminine. The grammatical gender of a word never changes. Like many other words, die is simply used for multiple purposes.

    Just like in English, there's no plural indefinite article.

    English German
    a man ein Mann
    men Männer

    You, you and you

    Most languages use different words to address one person, or several people.

    In German, when addressing a single person, use du:

    • Du bist mein Kind. (You are my child.)

    If you are talking to more than one person, use ihr:

    • Ihr seid meine Kinder. (You are my children.)

    Some English speakers would use "y'all" or "you guys" for this plural form of "you".

    Note that these only work for people you are familiar with (friends, family, …). For others, you would use the formal "you", which we teach later in this course. So stay tuned :)

    Ihr vs. er

    If you're new to German, ihr and er may sound confusingly similar, but there is actually a difference. ihr sounds similar to the English word "ear", and er sounds similar to the English word "air" (imagine a British/RP accent).

    Don't worry if you can't pick up on the difference at first. You may need some more listening practice before you can tell them apart. Also, try using headphones instead of speakers.

    Learn the pronouns together with the verb endings. This will greatly reduce the amount of ambiguity.

    Verb conjugation

    Here is the complete table for conjugating regular verbs:

    Example: trinken (to drink)

    English person ending German example
    I -e ich trinke
    you (singular informal) -st du trinkst
    he/she/it -t er/sie/es trinkt
    we -en wir trinken
    you (plural informal) -t ihr trinkt
    they -en sie trinken

    Notice that the first and the third person plural have the same ending.

    And here's the complete table for the irregular verb sein (to be):

    English German
    I am ich bin
    you (singular informal) are du bist
    he/she/it is er/sie/es ist
    we are wir sind
    you (plural informal) are ihr seid
    they are sie sind

    You will learn about the distinction between "formal" and "informal" later (it's easy).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Common Phrases10032 +5 lessons +26 lexemes0/5 •••
    Duo · bitte · bye · danke · english · fine · goodbye · guten abend · guten morgen · guten tag · hallo · hello · ja · nein · no · not · please · sorry · speaks · thanks · tschüss · yes
    22 words

    Common phrases

    Commonly used phrases are often shortened versions of a longer sentence. Or they might be leftovers from some old grammar that has otherwise fallen out of use. That means that their grammar might appear strange.

    For now, just learn them like you would learn a long word.

    Wie geht's?

    There are many ways to ask someone how they are doing. Take "How are you?," "How do you do?" and "How is it going?" as examples. In German, the common phrase or idiom uses the verb gehen (go): Wie geht es dir? (How are you?).

    This can be shortened to Wie geht's?.

    Willkommen can be a false friend

    In German, Willkommen means welcome as in "Welcome to our home", but it does not mean welcome as in "Thank you - You're welcome". The German for the latter is Gern geschehen (or just Gern!) or Keine Ursache.

    Entschuldigung!

    Sometimes, German words can be a mouthful. Later on, you will find that you can take long words apart, and recognize the meaning from their elements.

    Here's an example:

    Part Meaning
    ent- de-
    Schuld guilt
    -ig -y
    -gung noun suffix

    So, Entschuldigung literally means something like "deguiltification": "Take the guilt away from me" :)

    Duo

    Duo is the name of Duolingo's mascot (the green owl). He will guide you through this course. If you make him happy, he will make you happy :)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Accusative Case10041 +6 lessons +33 lexemes0/6 •••
    Milch · einen · esse · essen · esst · isst · trinke · trinken · trinkst · trinkt
    10 words

    German Cases

    In English, the words "he" and "I" can be used as subjects (the ones doing the action in a sentence), and they change to "him" and "me" when they are objects (the ones the action is applied to). Here's an example:

    Subject Verb Object
    I see him
    He sees me

    This is called a grammatical case: the same word changes its form, depending on its relationship to the verb. In English, only pronouns have cases. In German, most words other than verbs (such as nouns, pronouns, determiners, adjectives, etc.) have cases.

    You'll learn more about cases later; for now you just need to understand the difference between the two simplest cases: nominative and accusative.

    The subject of a sentence (the one doing the action) is in the nominative case. So when we say Die Frau spielt. (The woman plays.), "die Frau" is in the nominative.

    The accusative object is the thing or person that is directly receiving the action. For example, in Der Mann sieht den Ball. (The man sees the ball.), der Mann is the (nominative) subject and den Ball is the (accusative) object.

    For the articles, nominative and accusative are nearly the same. Only the masculine ("der") forms change:

    "a(n)" masc. neut. fem.
    Nominative ein ein eine
    Accusative einen ein eine
    "the" m. n. f. pl.
    Nom. der das die die
    Acc. den das die die

    Flexible sentence order

    The fact that most words in German are affected by the case explains why the sentence order is more flexible than in English. For example, you can say Das Mädchen hat den Apfel. (The girl has the apple.) or Den Apfel hat das Mädchen.. In both cases, den Apfel (the apple) is the accusative object, and das Mädchen is the subject (always nominative).

    However, take note that in German, the verb always has to be in position 2. If something other than the subject takes up position 1, the subject will then move after the verb.

    • Normally, I drink water.
    • Normalerweise trinke ich Wasser.

    Vowel change in some verbs

    A few common verbs change the vowel in the second and third person singular.

    Here is the table for a verb without vowel change:

    En. person person trinken
    I ich trinke
    you (sg.) du trinkst
    he/she/it er/sie/es trinkt
    we wir trinken
    you (pl.) ihr trinkt
    they sie trinken

    And here are three verbs with that vowel change. Notice that in the first two verbs, the 2nd and 3rd person singular seem the same. This is just because the du ending -st merged with the -s- of the verb stem. This is unrelated to the vowel change.

    person lesen sprechen
    ich lese spreche
    du liest sprichst
    er/sie/es liest spricht
    wir lesen sprechen
    ihr lest sprecht
    sie lesen sprechen

    Similarly, essen turns to du isst/er isst.

    Sprechen (to speak) will be introduced in one of the next lessons.

    Isst vs. ist

    Isst and ist sound exactly the same. So do Es ist ein Apfel. and Es isst ein Apfel. sound the same?

    Yes, but you can tell it's Es ist ein Apfel: Es isst ein Apfel is ungrammatical. The accusative of ein Apfel is einen Apfel. Hence, It is eating an apple translates as Es isst einen Apfel.

    Of course, this only works for masculine nouns. Other forms will look the same in nominative and accusative:

    • Er isst eine Banane.
    • Er ist eine Banane.

    Only context will tell you here :)

    Ich habe Brot

    In English, you can say "I'm having bread" when you really mean that you're eating or about to eat bread. This does not work in German. The verb haben refers to possession only. Hence, the sentence Ich habe Brot only translates to I have bread, not I'm having bread. Of course, the same applies to drinks. Ich habe Wasser only translates to I have water, not I'm having water.

    Conjugation is also slightly irregular: two forms lose the -b-.

    English person German example
    I ich habe
    you (sg.) du hast
    he/she/it er/sie/es hat
    we wir haben
    you (pl.) ihr habt
    they sie haben
  • 1670052469
    0.000Introduction10042 +3 lessons +12 lexemes0/3 •••
    Deutsch · England · Englisch · Hans · Julia · Karl · aus · deutschlands · heißt · kommt
    10 words

    Grammar break!

    There is no new grammar in this lesson. If you're confused, you can review the grammar points from earlier lessons.

    Harness the power of other learners

    Or you can check the discussion that's available for each sentence. You can reach these when tapping or clicking on the speech bubble. Your question might already have been answered there. Otherwise, you can leave a comment yourself.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Food 110052 +6 lessons +34 lexemes0/6 •••
    Durst · Eis · Essen · Fisch · Hunger · Pizza · Suppe · Tee · beef · beer · breakfast · cheese · chicken · coffee · dinner · egg · fish · food · fruit · gut · juice · lemon · lunch · meal · meat · oil · orange · pasta · plate · pork · salt · schmeckt · soup · strawberry · sugar · tea · tomato · vegetarian · wine
    39 words

    Ich habe Hunger!

    As mentioned in the "Accusative" lesson, haben is not used in the sense of "I'm having bread" or "I'm having tea" in German. Ich habe Brot only translates to "I have bread".

    German uses haben in some instances where English uses "to be":

    • Ich habe Hunger. (I am hungry.)

    • Ich habe Durst. (I am thirsty.)

    • Sie hat Recht. (She is right.)

    • Er hat Angst. (He is afraid.)

    Compound words

    A compound word is a word that consists of two or more words. These are written as one word (no spaces).

    The gender of a compound noun is always determined by its last element. This shouldn't be too difficult to remember, because the last element is always the most important one. All the previous elements merely describe the last element.

    • die Autobahn (das Auto + die Bahn)

    • der Orangensaft (die Orange + der Saft)

    • das Hundefutter (der Hund + das Futter)

    Sometimes, there's a connecting sound (Fugenlaut) between two elements.

    • die Orange + der Saft = der Orangensaft

    • der Hund + das Futter = das Hundefutter (the dog food)

    • die Liebe + das Lied = das Liebeslied (the love song)

    • der Tag + das Gericht = das Tagesgericht (dish of the day)

    Mittagessen — lunch or dinner?

    We're aware that "dinner" is sometimes used synonymously with "lunch", but for the purpose of this course, we're defining Frühstück as "breakfast", Mittagessen as "lunch", and "dinner/supper" as Abendessen / Abendbrot.

    Cute like sugar!

    The word süß means "sweet" when referring to food, and "cute" when referring to living beings.

    • Der Zucker ist süß. (The sugar is sweet.)
    • Die Katze ist süß. (The cat is cute.)

    Does Gemüse mean "vegetable" or "vegetables"?

    In German, Gemüse is used as a mass noun. That means it's grammatically singular and takes a singular verb.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Animals 110062 +3 lessons +17 lexemes0/3 •••
    Bär · Haustier · Hund · Katze · Kuh · Maus · Pferd · Schwein · Tier · fressen
    10 words

    Recognizing noun gender

    While noun genders might seem random for many words, there are quite a few ways to at least land a likely hit.

    For example, many German nouns have some kind of ending, which will always or often come with a particular gender.

    • Non-living objects that end in -e: these will almost always be feminine (Schokolade, Erdbeere, Orange, Banane, Suppe, …). One of the very few exceptions is der Käse. This also works for many, but not all animals (die Katze, Ente, Spinne, Biene, Fliege, …).

    • Nouns beginning with Ge- are often neuter. This is the only prefix determining gender. (das Gemüse, …)

    There are many more endings like these. You will learn more about them throughout this course.

    Fressen vs. essen

    Unlike English, German has two similar but different verbs for "to eat": essen and fressen. The latter is the standard way of expressing that an animal is eating something. Be careful not to use fressen to refer to humans – this would be a serious insult. Assuming you care about politeness, we will not accept your solutions if you use fressen with human subjects.

    The most common way to express that a human being is eating something is the verb essen. It is not wrong to use it for animals as well, so we will accept both solutions. But we strongly recommend you accustom yourself to the distinction between essen and fressen.

    Fortunately, both verbs have the same conjugation:

    essen fressen (for animals)
    ich esse ich fresse
    du isst du frisst
    er/sie/es isst er/sie/es frisst
    wir essen wir fressen
    ihr esst ihr fresst
    sie essen sie fressen
  • 1670052469
    0.000Plurals10071 +4 lessons +25 lexemes0/4 •••
    Bären · Eier · Fische · Hunde · Kühe · Menschen · Mäuse · Pferd · Schwein · Tiere · animals · apples · birds · books · cats · dogs · ducks · elephants · horses · newspapers · plates · sandwiches · turtles
    23 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Predicative 110072 +3 lessons +17 lexemes0/3 •••
    frei · kurz · lang · laut · leicht · leise · normal · perfekt · schlecht · toll
    10 words

    Predicate adjectives

    Predicate adjectives, i.e. adjectives that don't precede a noun, are not inflected.

    • Der Mann ist groß.
    • Die Männer sind groß.
    • Die Frau ist groß.
    • Die Frauen sind groß.
    • Das Haus ist groß.
    • Die Häuser sind groß.

    As you can see, the adjective remains in the base form, regardless of number and gender.

    "D'uh", you say? Keep digging into the German skills tree, and you will soon find the deeper reality of German adjectives :)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Negative and positive statements10081 +1 lesson +6 lexemes0/1 •••
    einfach · fertig · gesund · lustig · nicht · traurig
    6 words

    German Negatives - nicht

    There are different ways to negate expressions in German (much like in English you can use "no" in some cases, and "does not" in others). The German adverb nicht (not) is used very often, but sometimes you need to use kein (not a). Kein will be taught in a later lesson.

    Use nicht in the following situations:

    Nicht + definite article

    Nicht negates a noun that has a definite article:

    • Das ist nicht der Junge. (That is not the boy.)

    Nicht + possessive pronoun

    Nicht negates a noun that has a possessive pronoun:

    • Das ist nicht mein Glas. (That is not my glass.)

    Nicht negates a verb

    When negating a verb, use nicht.

    • Ich trinke nicht. (I do not drink.)

    Why does the nicht appear at the end here?

    Refer to the section "Position of nicht" below to find the answer.

    Nicht negates an adverb

    Nicht appears before an adverb or adverbial phrase:

    • Ich tanze nicht oft. (I don't dance often.)

    Nicht negates an adjective at the end of a sentence

    When an adjective is part of a verb, also use nicht.

    • Du bist nicht hungrig. (You are not hungry.)

    The infinitive here is hungrig sein (to be hungry).

    Position of Nicht

    Adverbs end up in different places in different languages. You cannot simply place the German adverb nicht where you would put "not" in English.

    The general rule is:

    Nicht appears before the item it negates.

    • Du bist nicht hungrig. (not hungry)
    • Ich tanze nicht oft. (not often)
    • Das ist nicht mein Glas. (not my glass)
    • Das ist nicht der Junge. (not the boy)

    So, what about Ich trinke nicht?

    ♫ The German Sentence Bracket ♫

    Consider this English sentence:

    • I wake up in China.

    The verb would be "wake up", the infinitive "to wake up". English keeps its verb elements close together. German, on the other hand, has a peculiar sentence structure:

    • Ich wache in China auf.

    The infinitive here is auf|wachen. German will normally put the last element of the infinitive (the part that changes with the person) in position 2 of the sentence. Everything else will end up at the very end. The rest of the sentence (for example, adverbs), will appear between this "sentence bracket".

    Here's a longer example:

    • Infinitive: mit Freunden ins Restaurant gehen (to go to the restaurant with friends)

    • Ich gehe mit Freunden ins Restaurant.

    If you're confused now, don't worry :) This will become clearer as you get lots of practice throughout this course.

    Why are we telling you this here? This bracket is the reason nicht might end up at the end of a sentence.

    Consider these examples:

    • Ich lerne Deutsch. (I learn German.) — Deutsch lernen (to learn German)
    • Ich trinke Bier. (I drink beer.) — Bier trinken (to drink beer)
    • Ich trinke nicht. — nicht trinken ("to not drink")

    This skill contains both negative and positive statements.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Questions and statements10082 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    kalt · langsam · müde · neu · schnell · schwer · schön · teuer · weit · wichtig
    10 words

    Yes/No Questions

    When asking a yes/no question in English, you would say:

    • "Is it cold?", but
    • "Do you have a dog?" or
    • "Does the man drink water?".

    German will not use "do" here. We will switch subject and verb for all verbs.

    • Ist es kalt?
    • Hast du einen Hund?
    • Trinkt der Mann Wasser?

    This skill contains both questions and statements.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Present 110091 +4 lessons +23 lexemes0/4 •••
    geht · lernt · lesen · läuft · macht · mögen · schlafen · schreibt · spiele · wollen
    10 words

    No continuous aspect

    Remember that in German, there's no continuous aspect, i.e. there are no separate forms for "I drink" and "I am drinking". There's only one form: Ich trinke.

    There's no such thing as Ich bin trinke or Ich bin trinken!

    Verb conjugation

    Conjugating regular verbs

    Here again is the complete table for conjugating regular verbs:

    Example: gehen (to go)

    English person German example
    I ich gehe
    you (sg. informal) du gehst
    he/she/it er/sie/es geht
    we wir gehen
    you (pl. informal) ihr geht
    they sie gehen

    Notice that the 1st and the 3rd person plural have the same ending.

    The -h- in gehen tells you that the -e- before it will have a "long" pronunciation. It is not pronounced!

    Vowel change in some verbs

    A few common verbs change the vowel in the second and third person singular.

    Normally the vowel will change:

    • from a to ä
    • from e to i(e)
    person schlafen sehen
    ich schlafe sehe
    du schläfst siehst
    er/sie/es schläft sieht
    wir schlafen sehen
    ihr schlaft seht
    sie schlafen sehen

    Other verbs in this skill are

    • fahren (to ride) — du fährst
    • waschen (to wash) — du wäschst

    In addition, when a verb stem ends in -s, second and third person singular forms will look the same:

    • lesen (to read) — du liest, er liest

    This is because the -s- from du …-st and the -s from the verb stem merge.

    Wollen and mögen

    Wollen (to want) and mögen (to like) follow a different conjugation system:

    English pronoun wollen mögen
    I want/like ich will mag
    you (sg. inf.) du willst magst
    he/she/it er/sie/es will mag
    we wir wollen mögen
    you (pl. inf.) ihr wollt mögt
    they sie wollen mögen

    Notice that here, the first and third person are the same (plural and singular). The vowel in singular is different from the vowel in plural.

    How do you like things in German?

    Use the verb mögen to express that you like something or someone.

    Mögen cannot be used for verbs!

    In a later lesson, you will learn to use the adverb gern(e) to express that you like doing* something.

    (The similar verb möchten can be followed by a verb, but Ich möchte Fußball spielen translates as "I would like to play soccer", not "I like playing soccer".)

    Mögen is used for things, animals, and people:

    • Ich mag Bier. (I like beer.)

    • Sie mag Katzen. (She likes cats.)

    • Wir mögen dich. (We like you.)

    • Ihr mögt Bücher. (You like books.)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Clothing10092 +3 lessons +17 lexemes0/3 •••
    clothes · hemdes · hose · hüten · jacke · kleide · kleidungen · mantel · pants · rock · schuh · tragen · wear · wears
    14 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Nature 1100101 +3 lessons +15 lexemes0/3 •••
    Natur · baume · berge · blume · erde · feuer · luft · meere · monds · wind
    10 words

    Lakes and seas - false friends ahoy!

    The German for "the lake" is der See (masculine) and the most commonly used word for "the sea" is das Meer (neuter).

    There's another slightly less commonly used word for "the sea": die See (feminine).

    Be careful not to confuse der See (the lake) and die See (the sea). Remember that when you learn a noun, you should always learn the gender with it.

    singular (masc.: "lake") (fem.: "sea")
    nominative der See die See
    accusative den See die See

    The plural forms are identical (only the plural of der See is commonly used).

    plural (masc.: "lakes") (fem.: "seas")
    nominative die Seen die Seen
    accusative die Seen die Seen

    There are not many noun pairs like this in German. Here is the most extreme example, with plural forms:

    • das Band (die Bänder) - the tape (band)
    • der Band (die Bände) - the volume/tome
    • die Band (pronounced as in English) (die Bands) - the music band
  • 1670052469
    0.000Possessive Pronouns100111 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    dein · deine · euerer · ihr · mein · meine · seins · unser
    8 words

    Personal Pronouns in the Nominative Case

    A pronoun is a word that represents a noun, like er does for der Mann. In the nominative case, the personal pronouns are simply the grammatical persons you already know: ich, du, er/sie/es, wir, ihr, and sie.

    Possessive pronouns

    German uses possessive pronouns similar to the English ones. For example "my" is mein in German, "his" is sein, and "her" is ihr.

    personal pronouns possessive pronouns
    ich mein
    du dein
    er/es sein
    sie (feminine) ihr
    wir unser
    ihr euer
    sie (plural) ihr

    Remember that in German, eu sounds like "boy", and the ending -er normally roughly sounds like "ma".

    Nominative forms

    Unlike English, these possessive pronouns change their endings in the same way as the indefinite article ein.

    • mein Bruder (ein Bruder)
    • meine Mutter (eine Mutter)

    This is mostly straightforward (just append the correct ending according to the noun). There is a slight irregularity: euer does not become euere, but eure (it loses an internal -e-).

    The following table has the forms in the nominative case. These are used for subjects, as in

    • Meine Katze ist super. (My cat is great.)
    der Hund das Insekt die Katze die Hunde
    indef. article ein ein eine (keine)
    ich mein mein meine meine
    du dein dein deine deine
    er/es sein sein seine seine
    sie (fem.) ihr ihr ihre ihre
    wir unser unser unsere unsere
    ihr euer euer eure eure
    sie (plural) ihr ihr ihre ihre

    As you might notice, ihr has several different functions, so make sure you understand the context it is used in.

    Demonstrative Pronouns

    The demonstrative pronouns in English are: this, that, these, and those. In German, in Nominative and Accusative, the demonstrative pronouns are the same as the definite articles.

    That means, der, die and das can also mean "that (one)" or "this (one)" depending on the gender of the respective noun, and "die" (plural) can mean "these" or "those."

    • Der ist komisch! (That one is strange!)
    • Meine Kinder? Die sind in England. (My kids? They/Those are in England.)

    When spoken, the definite articles can serve a similar function:

    • Der Junge liest eine Zeitung, der Junge liest ein Buch.
    • This boy is reading a newspaper, that boy is reading a book.

    The articles would be stressed in that case.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Nominative Pronouns100112 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    alle · alles · beiden · dies · jedes · jemand · manches · niemand · viel · viele
    10 words

    Some other pronouns

    Some other words can function as pronouns.

    The following ones change their endings like definite articles:

    der das
    this/these dieser dieses
    every jeder jedes
    some mancher manches
    die (fem.) die (pl.)
    diese diese
    jede ---
    manche manche
    • Dieser Junge isst, dieser (Junge) trinkt.
    • This boy eats, that (boy/one) drinks.

    • Jedes Kind mag Pizza. (Every kid likes pizza.)

    • Manche Kinder mögen Käse. (Some kids like cheese.)

    Viel vs. viele

    These roughly correspond to English "much/many". Use viel with uncountable nouns, viele with countable ones.

    • Ich trinke viel Wasser.
    • Ich habe viele Hunde.

    Alles oder nichts

    Just like nicht (not) has a look-alike nichts (nothing), alle (all) has alles (everything) as a counterpart.

    • Ich esse nicht. (I do not eat.)
    • Ich esse nichts. (I eat nothing.)
    • Ich esse alles. (I eat everything.)
    • Ich esse alle (Orangen). (I eat all (oranges).)

    Ein paar vs. ein Paar

    Ein paar (lowercase p) means "a few", "some" or "a couple (of)" (only in the sense of at least two, not exactly two!).

    Ein Paar (uppercase P) means "a pair (of)" and is only used for things that typically come in pairs of two, e.g. ein Paar Schuhe (a pair of shoes).

    So this is quite similar to English "a couple" (a pair) vs. "a couple of" (some).

    etwas vs. manche

    Both etwas and manche can be translated as "some" in certain contexts, but they don't have the same meaning.

    etwas means "some" before an uncountable noun, when the meaning is "a little bit of, a small quantity of": The following noun is always in the singular in this meaning.

    • etwas Wasser (some water, a bit of water)
    • Hast du etwas Brot? (do you have some bread / a bit of bread?)

    manche means "some" in the sense of "certain; some but not others" and almost always stands before a plural noun

    • Manche Kinder haben Hunger. (Some children are hungry [but others are not].)
    • Manche Häuser sind teurer als andere. (Some houses are more expensive than others.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Negatives100121 +2 lessons +13 lexemes0/2 •••
    kein · keine · keinen · keiner · nicht · nichts · nie · niemals
    8 words

    German Negatives

    There are different ways to negate expressions in German (much like in English you can use "no" in some cases, and "does not" in others). The German adverb nicht (not) is used very often, but sometimes you need to use kein (not a).

    Nicht

    As mentioned in the lesson "Not", you should use nicht in the following situations:

    • Negating a noun that has a definite article like der Junge (the boy) in Das ist nicht der Junge. (That is not the boy).
    • Negating a noun that has a possessive pronoun like mein Glas (my glass) in Das ist nicht mein Glas. (That is not my glass).
    • Negating the verb: Ich trinke nicht. (I do not drink.).
    • Negating an adverb or adverbial phrase. For instance, Ich tanze nicht oft. (I do not dance often)
    • Negating an adjective that is used with sein (to be): Ich bin nicht hungrig. (I am not hungry).

    For details, and to learn where to put nicht in a sentence, refer to the "Not" lesson.

    Kein

    Simply put, kein is composed of k + ein and placed where the indefinite article would be in a sentence. If you want to negate ein, use kein.

    Just like mein and the other possessive pronouns, kein changes its ending like ein.

    For instance, look at the positive and negative statement about these two nouns:

    • Er ist ein Mann. (He is a man) — Sie ist kein Mann. (She is not a/no man.)
    • Ich habe eine Katze. (I have a cat.) — Ich habe keine Katze. (I have no cat.)

    Here are the endings of the indefinite article so far:

    masc neut fem plural
    nominative ein ein eine ---
    accusative einen ein eine ---

    Here is the list of the respective kein forms:

    masc neut fem plural
    nominative kein kein keine keine
    accusative keinen kein keine keine

    Kein is also used for negating nouns that have no article: Er hat Brot. (He has bread.) versus Er hat kein Brot. (He has no bread.).

    As a general rule:

    • If you can use "not a/no" in English, use kein.
    • If you need to use "not", use nicht.

    Nicht vs. Nichts

    Nicht is an adverb and is useful for negations. On the other hand, nichts (nothing/anything) is a pronoun and its meaning is different from that of nicht.

    • Ich esse nicht. (I do not eat.)
    • Ich esse nichts. (I eat nothing.)

    Using nicht simply negates a fact, and is less overarching than nichts. For example, Der Schüler lernt nicht. (The student does not learn.) is less extreme than Der Schüler lernt nichts. (The student does not learn anything.).

    Keiner, keine, keines

    In German, "nobody" can be expressed in several ways.

    As long as it refers to people, niemand works just fine:

    • Niemand schläft. (Nobody sleeps.)

    There is also keiner. It changes endings like the definite articles:

    masc. neut. fem. plural
    nominative der das die die
    accusative den das die die
    masc. neut. fem. plural
    nominative keiner keines keine keine
    accusative keinen keines keine keine

    For now, we teach only the default version (which is masculine in German):

    • Keiner schläft. (None of them sleeps.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adverbs100122 +3 lessons +17 lexemes0/3 •••
    again · almost · already · also · always · anywhere · approximately · as · auch · away · clearly · completely · currently · definitely · easily · else · enough · especially · even · ever · exactly · far · finally · generally · gern · gerne · heiße · here · however · immer · just · late · later · least · more · much · necessarily · neither · never · noch · nor · normally · now · nur · once · only · perfectly · possibly · pretty · really · schon · slowly · so · sometimes · soon · still · then · there · together · too · twice · usually · very · well · wirklich · yet
    66 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Places 1100131 +3 lessons +20 lexemes0/3 •••
    Ecke · bahnhöfe · bibliothek · gebäude · gärten · häuser · märkte · restaurants · schlosses · schule
    10 words

    Recognizing noun gender

    As mentioned before, you can often know the gender of a noun by looking at the word ending.

    • non-living objects that end in -e: these will almost always be feminine (die Lampe, Schokolade, Erdbeere, Orange, Banane, Suppe, Hose, Jacke, Sonne, Straße, Brücke, Schule, …)
    • nouns beginning with Ge- are often neuter. This is the only prefix determining gender. (das Gebäude, Gemüse, Gesicht, Gesetz, …)

    In addition, rhyming can often help. If you already know a noun that rhymes with the new one, there's a good chance they will have the same gender. Go for it :)

    • der Fisch, der Tisch
    • der Raum, der Traum, der Baum
    • der Kopf, der Knopf

    Pronunciation of French loanwords

    When English uses a word from French, it usually pronounces it according to English sound rules. German will often sound more close to the original.

    An example for this is Restaurant. Like in French, the last syllable will sound roughly like "raw". The -t will be silent. Some people will pronounce the ending similar to English "rung" instead. Of course, the R- will sound like the German r, not the English one.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Stuff100132 +1 lesson +6 lexemes0/1 •••
    Feuer+zeug · Flugzeug · Zeug · fahrzeuge · spielzeugs · werkzeugen
    6 words

    Combining stuff

    German is well known for its long words that can be made up on the go by concatenating existing words. In this skill you will learn one very simple and commonly used way of forming compounds: adding -zeug (="stuff") to existing words.

    Remember that the last element determines gender and plural. So all new words in this lesson will be neuter.

    OK, because you asked: the longest "real" German word (so far) is:

    • Rindfleisch-etikettierungs-überwachungs-aufgaben-übertragungs-gesetz

    (Without the hyphens. We had to add those in order to be able to show the whole word…)

    It's a law on how to transfer tasks about the monitoring of the labeling of beef. At least that's what the word says.

    If you enjoyed this, check out "Rhabarberbarbara" on Youtube.

    No, words like this don't normally happen in German :)

    How much stuff?

    In English, you can't count "stuff" -- you can't use the plural "stuffs" or say that "there are three stuffs on the floor". Instead, "stuff" is a collective noun, referring to a group of things but used in the singular: "there is stuff on the floor".

    Some German -zeug words can work like this as well -- for example, Spielzeug and Werkzeug in the singular, without an article, mean "toys" and "tools", which are plural in English.

    Those words can also be used in a countable way: ein Spielzeug, zwei Werkzeuge "one toy, two tools". So "the tools" could be either das Werkzeug or die Werkzeuge -- the former would view the tools as a group, the latter would consider them individually.

    Look out for whether there is an indefinite article or number before the singular word to see whether it's used countably or uncountably.

    If there's a possessive word or a definite article before such a noun in the singular, it could be either: mein Werkzeug ist neu could mean either "My tool is new" or "My tools are new", for example; similarly with das Werkzeug ist neu which could be either "The tool is new" or "The tools are new".

    (An English word that works similarly is "fruit" -- "my fruit" could refer to just one apple, or it could refer to two apples and a banana all together, depending on whether "fruit" is used countably or uncountably.)

    Other -zeug words are always regular countable words, such as Flugzeug "airplane" or Feuerzeug "lighter".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Accusative Pronouns100141 +3 lessons +19 lexemes0/3 •••
    deinen · dich · es · euch · ihn · meines · mich · seines · sie · uns
    10 words

    Pronouns

    Personal Pronouns in the Accusative Case

    Aside from the nominative case, most of the German pronouns are declined according to case. Like in English, when the subject becomes the object, the pronoun changes. For instance, ich changes to mich (accusative object) as in Sie sieht mich. (She sees me.).

    Nominative (subject) Accusative (object)
    ich (I) mich (me)
    du (you singular informal) dich (you singular informal)
    er (he) sie (she) es (it) ihn (him) sie (her) es (it)
    wir (we) uns (us)
    ihr (you plural informal) euch (you plural informal)
    sie (they) sie (them)

    Notice that apart from masculine singular, the third person forms are the same in nominative and accusative. The masculine form, which does change, has the same endings as the definite article (der becomes den).

    Possessive Pronouns in the Accusative Case

    You might remember from the lesson "Personal Pronouns" that German possessive pronouns change their endings like the indefinite article:

    • ein Hund, mein Hund
    • eine Katze, meine Katze

    This extends to all cases. You already know that in the accusative case, only masculine singular changes:

    • Ein Hund schläft. Er sieht einen Hund.

    but:

    • Eine Katze schläft. Sie sieht eine Katze. (no change)

    So, if you see einen, meinen, unseren and so forth with a singular noun, you will know two things:

    • the noun is masculine
    • the noun is in the accusative case (probably the object of the sentence)

    Consider this example:

    • Meinen Hund mag die Frau nicht.

    It is clear here that the dog must be the object (accusative). So actually the woman does not like the dog.

    Here is the table of possessive pronouns for the accusative case:

    Accusative der Hund das Insekt die Katze die Hunde
    indef. article einen ein eine (keine)
    ich meinen mein meine meine
    du deinen dein deine deine
    er/es seinen sein seine seine
    sie (fem.) ihren ihr ihre ihre
    wir unseren unser unsere unsere
    ihr euren euer eure eure
    sie (plural) ihren ihr ihre ihre

    Other declining words

    Viel vs. viele

    These roughly correspond to English "much/many". Use viel with uncountable nouns, viele with countable ones.

    • Ich trinke viel Wasser.
    • Ich habe viele Hunde.

    Viele changes endings like the articles. But because the plural forms are the same for nominative and accusative, for now it will look always the same.

    Jeder

    Jeder changes endings like definite articles:

    • die Frau, jede Frau
    • das Mädchen, jedes Mädchen
    • der Mann, jeder Mann — den Mann, jeden Mann (accusative)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Household 1100142 +4 lessons +26 lexemes0/4 •••
    Decke · Zaun · balkone · dächer · fenster · treppen · türen · wohnung · wänden · öffnest
    10 words

    Möbel

    Möbel corresponds to English "furniture". While "furniture" is singular, Möbel is normally only used in the plural.

    • Die Möbel sind super! (The furniture is great!)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Conjunctions100151 +4 lessons +13 lexemes0/4 •••
    aber · because · but · da · dass · denn · doch · entweder · if · obwohl · oder · or · that · weil · wenn · when · whenever · while
    18 words

    German Conjunctions

    A conjunction like wenn (when) or und (and) connects two parts of a sentence together.

    Coordinating conjunctions

    Coordinating conjunctions form a group of coordinators (like und (and), aber (but)), which combine two items of equal importance; here, each clause can stand on its own and the word order does not change.

    • Ich mag Schokolade. Sie mag Pizza.
    • Ich mag Schokolade und sie mag Pizza.

    Examples: und, oder, aber, denn

    Subordinating conjunctions

    Subordinating conjunctions combine an independent clause with a dependent clause; the dependent clause cannot stand on its own and its word order will be different than if it did. In these subordinate clauses, the verb switches from the second position to the last.

    • Ich bin gesund. Ich laufe oft.
    • Ich bin gesund, weil ich oft laufe.

    • Ich spreche gut Deutsch. Ich lerne oft Deutsch.

    • Ich spreche gut Deutsch, weil ich oft Deutsch lerne.

    Examples: weil, wenn, dass, obwohl

    Correlative conjunctions

    Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join sentence parts of equal importance. For instance, entweder...oder (either...or) is such a pair and can be used like this: Der Schuh ist entweder blau oder rot. (This shoe is either blue or red.).

    In German, conjunctions do not change with the case (i.e. they are not declinable).

    • Du trägst einen Rock. Du trägst eine Hose.
    • Du trägst entweder einen Rock oder eine Hose.

    • Du wäschst den Rock. Du trägst eine Hose.

    • Entweder du wäschst den Rock, oder du trägst eine Hose.
    • Du wäschst entweder den Rock oder (du) trägst eine Hose.

    Examples: entweder … oder, nicht nur … sondern auch, weder … noch

    Sondern

    Sondern works like "but … instead" in English. It only takes the element that is different:

    • Ich trage kein Kleid. Ich trage eine Hose.
    • Ich trage kein Kleid, sondern eine Hose.

    • Sie kommt nicht aus Deutschland. Sie kommt aus China.

    • Sie kommt nicht aus Deutschland, sondern aus China.
  • 1670052469
    0.000People 1100152 +4 lessons +25 lexemes0/4 •••
    babies · dame · freund · freundinnen · herren · leute · mensch · namen · personen · vornamen
    10 words

    Leute

    In English, you refer to one "person", but multiple "people". In German, Leute is also only used in the plural. The singular is eine Person.

    Ich bin Türke. Ich komme aus Berlin.

    Germany has many Turkish people. These are not necessarily from Turkey. Most have had their parents or even their grandparents born in Germany.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Questions 2100161 +3 lessons +20 lexemes0/3 •••
    antwort · fragen · wann · was · wessen · wo · wofür · woher · wohin · worüber
    10 words

    Yes/No Questions

    Questions can be asked by switching the subject and verb. For instance,

    • Du verstehst das. (You understand this.)

    becomes

    • Verstehst du das? (Do you understand this?).

    These kinds of questions will generally just elicit yes/no answers. In English, the main verb "to be" follows the same principle. "You are hungry." becomes "Are you hungry?".

    In German, all verbs follow this principle. There's no do-support.

    Asking a Question in German With a W-Word

    There are seven W-questions in German:

    English German
    what was
    who wer
    where wo
    when wann
    how wie
    why warum
    which welcher

    Don't mix up wer and wo, which are "switched" in English :)

    Some of these will change according to case.

    Was (what)

    If you ask was with a preposition, the two normally turn into a new word, according to the following pattern:

    English preposition wo-
    for what für wofür
    about what über worüber
    with what mit womit

    If the preposition starts with a vowel, there will be an extra -r- to make it easier to pronounce.

    This wo- prefix does not mean "where".

    Wer (who)

    Wer is declinable and needs to adjust to the cases. The adjustment depends on what the question is targeting.

    If you ask for the subject of a sentence (i.e. the nominative object), wer (who) remains as is:

    • Wer ist da? (Who is there?).

    If you ask for the direct (accusative) object in a sentence, wer changes to wen (who/whom). As a mnemonic, notice how wen rhymes with den in den Apfel.

    • Wen siehst du? — Ich sehe den Hund.
    • (Whom do you see? — I see the dog.)

    You will soon learn about the Dative case. You have to use wem then. And there is a forth case in German (Genitive). You would use wessen here. This corresponds to English "whose".

    The endings look like the endings of der (but don't change with gender/number):

    case masc. Form of wer
    nominative der wer
    accusative den wen
    dative dem wem

    Welche(r/s) (which)

    Welche- words are used to ask about for a specific item out of a group of items, such as "which car is yours?".

    This declines not only for case, but also for gender. The endings are the same as for definite articles:

    article welch*
    der welcher
    das welches
    die welche
    die (pl.) welche
    den welchen

    Wo (where)

    In German, you can inquire about locations in several ways.

    Wo (where) is the general question word, but if you are asking for a direction in which someone or something is moving, you may use *wohin* (where to).

    Consider these examples:

    • Wo ist mein Schuh? (Where is my shoe?)

    • Wohin gehst du? (Where are you going (to)?)

    Furthermore, wohin is separable into wo + hin:

    • Wo ist mein Schuh hin? (Where did my shoe go?)

    The same goes for woher (where from):

    • Woher kommst du? (Where are you from)

    might become

    • Wo kommst du her?
    English German
    where wo
    where to wohin
    where from woher

    Wann (when)

    Wann (when) does not change depending on the case. Wann can be used with conjunctions such as seit (since) or bis (till):

    • Seit wann wartest du? (Since when have you been waiting?)

    • Bis wann geht der Film? (Till when does the movie last?).

    Don't confuse wann with wenn which you learned in Conjunctions. Both translate to "when" in English, but they have different functions in German.

    • Wann kommst du? (When are you coming?)

    • Ich schlafe nicht, wenn ich Musik höre. (I don't sleep when I listen to music)

    Warum (why)

    Warum (why) is also not declinable. It will never change endings. Wieso, Weshalb, and Weswegen can be used instead of Warum. There's no difference in meaning.

    Here is an example. All four following sentences mean "Why is the car so old?".

    • Warum ist das Auto so alt?

    • Wieso ist das Auto so alt?

    • Weshalb ist das Auto so alt?

    • Weswegen ist das Auto so alt?

    Wie viel vs. wie viele

    Wie viel is used with uncountable or countable nouns (how much/how many), and wie viele is only used with countable nouns (how many). Some people think that "wie viel" can only be used with uncountable nouns, but that is not true.

    • Wie viel Milch trinkst du? (How much milk do you drink?)

    • Wie viel(e) Tiere siehst du? (How many animals do you see?)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Family 1100162 +4 lessons +20 lexemes0/4 •••
    Eltern · bruder · familie · geschwister · mutter · partner · schwester · söhne · töchter · vater
    10 words

    Informal and formal words for family members

    Just like in English, there are informal and formal words for "mother", "father", "grandmother", and "grandfather". Note that in German, the difference between formal and informal is a lot more pronounced than in English. The informal terms are pretty much only used within your own family.

    formal informal
    die Mutter (the mother) die Mama (the mom)
    der Vater (the father) der Papa (the dad)
    die Großmutter (the grandmother) die Oma (the grandma)
    der Großvater (the grandfather) der Opa (the grandpa)

    Family plurals

    You might notice that most members of the close family have their own "system" of plurals:

    singular plural
    die Mutter die Mütter
    der Vater die Väter
    der Bruder die Brüder
    die Tochter die Töchter
    die Schwester die Schwestern

    Schwester has an extra -n, because it can't change its vowel (e has no umlaut).

    Eltern

    Eltern (parents) has no singular, unlike in English. We normally refer to Mutter or Vater then.

    If necessary, there is a word das Elternteil (literally, "the parents part"). But this is only used in formal settings, for example on forms.

    Alternative words for family members

    There are countless alternative words for certain family members. A lot of them are regionalisms or influenced by your own family's heritage. Some of them are ambiguous as well. For instance, some people call their father "papa", and some people call their grandfather "papa".

    We can't accept all these terms, and since translations used in the German course for English speakers may also pop up in the English course for German speakers, we don't want to confuse German speakers with these words. Please understand that we're not going to add more alternatives. In your own interest, stick to the ones suggested by Duolingo (see above).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Accusative Prepositions100171 +1 lesson +6 lexemes0/1 •••
    durch · entlang · für · gegen · ohne · um
    6 words

    Prepositions

    Prepositions take a noun (or a noun phrase):

    • I talk with a friend from school.

    In German, prepositions will change this noun into one of the cases (but never into nominative).

    Here, you learn those that always trigger the accusative case.

    Remember that as long as the noun is not masculine singular, the nominative and the accusative will look the same.

    • Der Hund trinkt den Saft. (both are masculine)
    • Die Katze trinkt die Milch. (both are feminine)

    Accusative prepositions

    Accusative prepositions always trigger the accusative case.

    • Nicht ohne meinen Hund! (Not without my dog!)
    • Die Suppe ist für den Mann ohne Zähne. (The soup is for the man without teeth.)

    German has these common accusative prepositions: durch, für, gegen, ohne, um

    Entlang

    Entlang is a strange word :) It is commonly used with the accusative case. But then it has to appear after the noun.

    • Ich gehe den Fluss entlang. (I walk along the river.)

    It can be used before the noun, but then triggers a different case. This sounds a bit old-fashioned or stilted today. So better use it after the noun.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Numbers 1100172 +4 lessons +27 lexemes0/4 •••
    acht · drei · eins · es gibt · fünf · nummer · sechs · sieben · vier · zwei
    10 words

    German numbers

    You might notice that German numbers look very similar to those in English. The two languages are closely related. So any time you encounter a new word, it's worth checking whether you can find a similar-looking word in English.

    At some point, you might realize that there are several more or less consistent changes between English and German. Here are some:

    Change English German
    t > s/z ten, two zehn, zwei
    gh > ch eight acht
    v > b seven sieben
    th > d/t three drei
    o > ei one, two eins, zwei

    Generally, the vowels change faster than the consonants. So go for the consonants when looking for related words.

    Zahlen, zahlen, zählen

    You learned bezahlen (to pay) earlier. There's also the word zahlen, which also means to pay. In this lesson, you learn zählen, which means "to count". Don't confuse the two.

    In addition, you will see Zahlen. The upper-case initial tells you this is a noun. It is the plural of die Zahl (the number).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Food 2100181 +5 lessons +36 lexemes0/5 •••
    Butter · Frühstück · Honig · Marmelade · Milch · Mittagessen · Müsli · Nuss · frühstücken · zu mittag
    10 words

    Küche vs. Kuchen

    Die Küche (the kitchen) and der Kuchen (the cake) are often confused by learners. To German ears, they sound quite different. One reason is that in Küche, the vowel is short, while the vowel in Kuchen is long.

    singular plural
    die Küche die Küchen
    der Kuchen die Kuchen

    Kochen (to cook) also has a short vowel.

    Schmecken

    Schmecken is very similar to the English word "to taste":

    • Ich schmecke Knoblauch! (I taste garlic!)
    • Knoblauch schmeckt super! (Garlic tastes great!)

    In addition, schmecken can be used by itself:

    • Die Pizza schmeckt nicht! (The pizza does not taste good!)

    Some popular food

    Müsli

    Müsli originally refers to "Bircher Müesli", a Swiss breakfast dish, based on rolled oats and fresh or dried fruits.

    Nowadays, people will use it for all kinds of cereals or granola, often with high sugar content.

    Hähnchen

    Hähnchen usually refers to a chicken that has been turned into a dish. While derived from the word for "male chicken" (der Hahn), the only distinction today is that it is a food item.

    Remember that words ending in -chen are always neuter: das Hähnchen.

    Salat

    Salat can refer to the dish, as well as to the green leaves (usually lettuce) that often go into it.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Dative Case100182 +3 lessons +13 lexemes0/3 •••
    Frau · Kind · Mann · dem · der · einem · einer · gebt · sagt · zeigt
    10 words

    The Dative Case

    Welcome to the third important case in German :) Later on, there will be a last, less important one.

    Remember the Accusative ?

    You already saw that the accusative case can be used in different ways.

    It can signify the object of a sentence:

    • Der Hund frisst den Vogel. (The dog is eating the bird.)

    This is called the direct object (or accusative object).

    It can also be used in combination with some prepositions:

    • Sie geht ohne den Hund. (She walks without the dog.)
    • Er hat einen Mantel ohne Knöpfe. (He has a coat without buttons.)

    Dative object

    The dative case also has a range of different functions.

    In this lesson, you learn to use it with the indirect object. This is also called the dative object.

    The indirect object in a sentence is the receiver of the direct (accusative) object.

    For example, Frau is the indirect (dative) object in

    • Das Mädchen gibt einer Frau den Apfel. (A girl gives the apple to a woman.)

    You can think about it as "the other person involved" in a transaction.

    • Ich gebe dem Mann einen Apfel. (I give the man an apple.)
    • Sie zeigt dem Kind den Hund. (She shows the child the dog.)

    As a rule the dative object comes before the accusative object, if none of these objects is a pronoun (things are a little more complicated if pronouns come into play):

    Dative verbs

    The dative is also used for certain dative verbs such as danken (to thank) and antworten (to answer), or helfen (to help):

    • Ich danke dem Kind. (I thank the child.)
    • Ich helfe der Frau. (I help the woman.)
    • Ich antworte meinem Bruder. (I answer my brother.)

    These verbs don't have an accusative object.

    Dative articles

    Note that the dative changes all articles for the words.

    For example, die Katze is a feminine noun. However, the article in dative will be der. This might look like the masculine article. But in the context of a sentence, there will never be any confusion between the two, as long as you know your genders. This is one reason why it's so important to know the gender of a word.

    definite articles Nominative Accusative Dative
    masculine der den dem
    neuter das das dem
    feminine die die der
    plural die die den
    indefinite articles Nominative Accusative Dative
    masculine ein einen einem
    neuter ein ein einem
    feminine eine eine einer
    plural (keine) (keine) (keinen)

    Notice how masculine and neuter look the same in Dative (just like they look the same for Nominative indefinite articles).

    This also means that if you see a noun in the Dative, and the article ends in -r, it will be a feminine word. Alternatively, if it ends in -m, it won't.

    It is very much worth remembering these Dative endings, because they will pop up in different context, and help you a lot to sort out the grammar. In a way, Dative is the "simplest" case :)

    Dative endings
    Masculine/Neuter -m
    Feminine -r
    Plural -n

    Plural Nouns in Dative

    Here's a great rule:

    Plural Dative: Everything gets an -n

    (Insert Oprah Winfrey GIF here)

    You just saw that articles (also pronouns etc.) get an -n ending in dative plural.

    Later, you will learn that the German ending system for adjectives is a bit complicated. However, in dative plural, you just add an -n.

    It goes so far that even plural forms of nouns get an extra -n in the Dative.

    • Er hat drei Hunde. Er spielt mit drei Hunden. (He plays with three dogs.)
    • Die Computer sind alt. Ich antworte den Computern. (I answer the computers.)

    There are two "exceptions":

    • If the plural already end in -n, you're set.
    • If the plural ends in -s, there's also no change.

    Even more -n

    Some masculine nouns add an -en or -n ending in the dative and in all other cases besides the nominative. For example in the dative, it is dem Jungen (the boy).

    If you want to look these up, the term for them is "n-Declension".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Money100183 +2 lessons +13 lexemes0/2 •••
    besitzt · cents · dollar · euros · gelder · gewinnt · kaufst · kosten · preise · reich
    10 words

    Euro or Euros?

    In German, the singular is Euro and the plural is usually Euro as well. As a rule of thumb, use Euro when talking about a specific amount, e.g. 200 Euro.

    In some contexts, the form Euros is used as well. For instance, you can say Euros to refer to individual euro coins, an unquantified amount of euros, or euros as opposed to a different currency, e.g.:

    • Ich habe hundert Schweizer Franken, aber keine Euros (I have a hundred Swiss francs but no euros).

    Many native speakers use either plural form regardless of context.

    In English, either plural form is perfectly fine. The plural form euro tends to be preferred in the Republic of Ireland, and the plural form euros tends to preferred pretty much anywhere else. Originally, the plural form euro was supposed to be used in official EU documents, but that's no longer the case.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Dative Pronouns100191 +4 lessons +25 lexemes0/4 •••
    Trinkgeld · dir · euch · helft · ihm · ihnen · ihr · meinem · mir · uns
    10 words

    Personal Pronouns in the Dative Case

    Many words change in the dative case. For the third person pronouns, the following are different from the nominative case: the masculine pronoun is ihm (to him), the feminine is ihr (to her), the neuter is ihm (to it), and the plural is ihnen (to them).

    Nominative Accusative Dative
    ich (I) mich (me) mir (to me)
    du dich dir
    er / es / sie ihn / es / sie ihm / ihm / ihr
    wir uns uns
    ihr euch euch
    sie sie ihnen

    Some observations:

    • In dative, mir, dir, ihr (to me / you / her) rhyme.

    • In the third person, the endings are the same as for the articles: -m, -r, -n. However, plural dative is "ihnen" (not ihn, as you might expect).

    • In the second person plural, accusative and dative pronouns are the same.

    Now you can understand why, when thanking a female person, it is only correct to say Ich danke ihr ("I thank her", literally "I give-thank to her") and not Ich danke sie (that sounds like "I thank she" would sound to an English speaker).

    Dative verbs

    Remember that some verbs have a dative object. This is just a quirk of German. There was a reason for it when these words were created, but it's not easy to understand anymore, after a lot of language change.

    In short, you just have to learn these :) There aren't very many.

    Gehören literally means to "belong to". But don't translate too literally, often a different translation will be more natural.

    • Wem gehört das Kleid? ("Whose dress is it?" - Literally, "Whom does the dress belong to?")
  • 1670052469
    0.000Family 2100192 +3 lessons +16 lexemes0/3 •••
    Cousin · Cousine · Neffe · Nichte · Onkel · Tante · Ur+großmutter · Urenkel · Verwandte · Zwilling
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Dative Prepositions100201 +3 lessons +11 lexemes0/3 •••
    bei · beim · mit · nach · seit · vom · von · zu · zum · zur
    10 words

    Dative prepositions

    Earlier, you learned that some prepositions always trigger the accusative case.

    The most common ones are durch, für, gegen, ohne, um.

    In the same way, dative prepositions always trigger the dative case.

    Again, here are the common ones: aus, bei, gegenüber, mit, nach, seit, von, zu.

    Contractions

    Some prepositions and articles can be contracted.

    preposition + article contraction
    bei + dem beim
    von + dem vom
    vor + das vors
    zu + dem zum
    zu + der zur

    There are some more, which you will learn later.

    Seit

    Seit roughly means "since". However, it works a bit differently.

    First, it always denotes something that is still going on.

    Second, it has three different ways of usage.

    Consider these examples:

    • Ich lerne seit sechs Jahren Englisch. (I'm learning English for six years now.)
    • Ich lerne seit 2012 Englisch (I've been learning English since 2012.)
    • Ich lerne Englisch, seit ich denken kann. (I've been learning English since I can think.)

    In the first example, seit defines a stretch of time, which reaches into the present.

    In the second example, it also defines a stretch of time, reaching into the present. But it defines this stretch of time by its starting point.

    Seit can also be a subordinating conjunction (check the lesson "Conjunctions"). In these, the verb leaves the second position of the sentence, and ends up at the end. This is why in the last example, ich kann denken (I can think) turns into seit ich denken kann.

    Zu Hause vs. nach Hause

    Zu Hause means at home, and nach Hause means home (homewards, not at home).

    The -e at the end of zu Hause and nach Hause is an archaic dative ending, which is no longer used in modern German, but survived in certain fixed expressions.

    • Ich bin zu Hause. (I am at home.)

    • Ich gehe nach Hause. (I am walking home.)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Body 1100202 +4 lessons +23 lexemes0/4 •••
    Mund · Nase · Ohr · Zahn · augen · drücke · haaren · halse · kopf · körper
    10 words

    Hals

    Der Hals refers to the whole connection between head and shoulders. German does have more specialized words for "neck" and "throat", but we normally use Hals for both.

    Haare

    Das Haar normally refers to a single hair. It can be used to refer to all the hair on someone's head, but is considered slightly outdated or poetic.

    • Seine Haare sind lang. (ok)
    • Sein Haar ist lang. (sounds a bit old)

    Bein

    Das Bein refers to the leg. It used to mean "bone" a long time ago. This meaning survives in some word combinations:

    • Elfenbein (ivory, literally "elephant bone")
    • Eisbein (pork knuckle, literally "ischias bone", because it referred to hip meat before)
    • Beinhaus (bone house)
    • Gebein(e) (a collection of bones)

    Magen

    Der Magen is the stomach, the part of your body that starts digestion. It is not commonly used to refer to the belly (der Bauch).

    Brust

    Die Brust can have several meanings, depending on context.

    • Komm an meine Brust! - This means the chest area. It will always be used in the singular.
    • Vögel haben keine Brüste. (Birds don't have breasts) - This refers to female breasts. It can be used in the singular.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Formal you100212 +1 lesson +3 lexemes0/1 •••
    ihnen · sie
    2 words

    Surprise! There's another way of addressing people. The good news is: it's super easy. Just use the "they" forms when talking to people you're not close with.

    Need more details? Then read on :)

    German You: Who are you talking to?

    In English, "you" can be either singular or plural, and no distinction is made between formal and informal. In German, there are three ways of saying "you".

    Du

    If you are familiar with someone, you use du (which is called "duzen"). For example, if you talk to your mother, you would say:

    • "Hast du jetzt Zeit, Mama?" (Do you have time now, Mommy?).

    Use this form for family members, co-students, children and young adults.

    Ihr

    If you refer to more than one person, you use ihr. This is also a "familiar" form, so use it in the same settings as du.

    The German ihr you learned earlier is the informal plural of "you," like in

    • Hans und Karl, habt ihr Zeit? (Hans and Karl, do you have time?)

    Sie (formal you)

    If you are not familiar with someone or still wish to stay formal and express respect, you use Sie (so-called "siezen"). For example, you would always address your professor like this:

    • Haben Sie jetzt Zeit, Herr Schmidt? (Do you have time now, Mr. Schmidt?)

    Sie is also used for multiple people. But you can't translate it well with "you all" or "you guys", because that would sound too informal.

    Here are the three forms of "you", and "they" for comparison:

    English person ending German example
    you (singular informal) -st du trinkst
    you (plural informal) -t ihr trinkt
    you (formal) -en Sie trinken
    they -en sie trinken

    When spoken, "they" and formal "you" are identical. So, in a way, Germans formally address people like "How are they today?"

    How do you know if sie means "she", "they", or "you"?

    You can distinguish the formal Sie from the plural sie (they) because the formal Sie will always be capitalized. However, it will remain ambiguous at the beginning of written sentences.

    For instance, Sie sind schön. can either refer to a beautiful individual or a group of beautiful people. The verbs for sie (they) and Sie (you) are conjugated the same. On Duolingo, either should be accepted unless the context suggests otherwise. In real life, there's always context. Don't worry about misunderstandings.

    Fortunately, the verb for sie (she) is different. Sie ist schön. only translates to "She is beautiful." There's no ambiguity.

    Other formal "you"s

    There are more ways to address people formally in German, but they are not in common use and/or outdated, so we don't support them in this course. You might encounter them in Middle Ages reenactments or so :)

    The third person singular was used:

    • Hat er heute gut geschlafen? (literally, "Has he slept well today?")

    The second person plural was also used, and is still used locally:

    • Ihr habt einen schönen Hut. (literally, "You all have a nice hat.")

    You will encounter the informal you in this skill as well

    As some of the sentences in this skill are shared among multiple skills, you will encounter the informal you in this skill as well. For technical reasons, this cannot be changed at this point. Please do not send a report regarding this issue.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Some-100213 +1 lesson +5 lexemes0/1 •••
    irgendwann · irgendwas · irgendwer · irgendwie · irgendwo
    5 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Shopping100221 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    Kundin · Supermarkt · bäckerei · einkaufen · einkaufeswägen · geschäfts · kunden · läden · marktplatz · verkaufen
    10 words

    Kaufen vs. einkaufen

    Kaufen is normally used in the meaning of "to buy":

    • Ich kaufe einen Hut.

    Einkaufen is normally used without an object, and often refers to shopping. It can be used in conjunction with gehen:

    • Ich kaufe im Supermarkt ein. (I shop in the supermarket)
    • Wann gehst du einkaufen? (When do you go shopping?)

    Verkaufen means "to sell". The prefix ver- is often associated with an "away" notion.

    Laden, Geschäft

    A variety of words exist for "shop". These are two common ones, with roughly exchangeable usage.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Travel100222 +6 lessons +45 lexemes0/6 •••
    Ferien · abroad · afrikas · america · american · around · autos · bayerns · busse · china · chinese · drive · england · europe · european · fahrrad · france · french · germany · international · italian · south · travel · travels · turn · turns · urlaube · wien · züge · österreich
    30 words

    Sehenswürdigkeiten?!

    The word Sehenswürdigkeit (sight as in sightseeing) is made up of several meaningful parts: sehen + s + würdig + keit.

    Let's look at each part and its meaning.

    Part Meaning
    sehen to see
    -s- connecting element
    würdig to be worthy
    -keit noun suffix

    Literally Sehenswürdigkeit means something which is worthy to see.

    The connecting element -s- is used to link words together.

    The ending -keit turns an adjective into a noun.

    Often the ending of a compound noun is a good indicator for the gender of the noun. For example, if a noun ends in -keit, it will always be feminine (die).

    Urlaub vs. Ferien

    Just like in English there's "holidays" and "vacation", in German there are Ferien and Urlaub. They can be used interchangeably to some extent.

    Ferien only exists as a plural noun:

    • Die Ferien sind im Sommer. (The holidays are in summer.)

    Urlaub only exists as a singular noun:

    • Wann ist der Urlaub? (When is the vacation?)

    Visum

    In English, you need "a visa". In German, the singular is das Visum, Visa is the plural (as it is in Latin, the source language of this word).

    Weg vs. weg

    Der Weg (with a long -e-) roughly means "the path".

    • Der Weg ist lang. (The path is long.)

    The word weg (with a short, open -e-) roughly means "away". Here are some examples:

    • Geh weg! (Go away!)
    • Ich bin weg! (I'm gone!)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Numbers 2100223 +4 lessons +23 lexemes0/4 •••
    achtzig · dreiundzwanzig · dreißig · einundzwanzig · fünfzig · neunzig · sechzig · siebzig · vierzig · zwanzig
    10 words

    German numbers

    You learned earlier that the numbers from 1-19 are very similar to those in English.

    This mostly continues in German, with one important quirk. Did you ever notice that the digits in numbers 13-19 are kind of "switched" in English? German continues that through to 99.

    So 84 would be vier|und|acht|zig (literally, four and eighty).

    This might take some getting used to, but at least it's consistent ;)

    Hundert

    For "100", people would usually just say hundert, not einhundert (as in English).

    Huge numbers

    There used to be two different systems for huge numbers, called "short scale" and "long scale". Unfortunately, German and American English ended up with different ones. British English used to use the long scale, but switched to short scale.

    Number US English (short scale) German (long scale)
    10^6 million Million
    10^9 billion Milliarde
    10^12 trillion Billion
    10^15 quadrillion Billiarde
    10^18 quintillion Trillion

    (10^6 means a one with six zeros)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Colors100231 +4 lessons +31 lexemes0/4 •••
    black · blau · blaue · blue · brown · colorful · farben · gelb · gray · green · grün · orange · pink · purple · red · rot · roten · roter · schwarz · weiß · white · yellow
    22 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Imperative100232 +2 lessons +11 lexemes0/2 •••
    esst · geben · geh · handele · lass · lies · nimm · ruft · seid · trinke
    10 words

    Imperative

    The imperative mood is used to express commands, just like in English.

    There are three different forms, according to the three types of "you" in German.

    Du imperative

    The imperative for du is very similar to English:

    • Du gehst nach Hause. (You go home.)
    • Geh nach Hause! (Go home!)

    For most verbs, to come up with the correct verb form, just lose the -st ending:

    • Du arbeitest nachts. (You work at night)
    • Arbeite nachts! (Work at night!)

    • Du nimmst das Taxi. (You take the taxi.)

    • Nimm das Taxi! (Take the taxi!)

    You might have noticed that some common verbs have an extra umlaut in the 2nd/3rd person singular:

    • fahren, du fährst
    • schlafen, du schläfst

    In the imperative, these do not have an umlaut:

    • Du fährst mit dem Taxi.
    • Fahr mit dem Taxi!

    Ihr imperative

    The second one is used to address more than one person informally. It uses the same conjugation as the regular ihr form of the present tense. This form of the imperative does not include a personal pronoun.

    • Ihr fahrt nach Paris. (You go to Paris.)
    • Fahrt nach Paris! (Go to Paris!)

    Sie imperative

    The third one is used to address one or more people formally. It uses the same conjugation as the regular Sie form of the present tense. The formal imperative is the only form to include the personal pronoun (Sie). Note that the word order is reversed. The verb always precedes the pronoun. It essentially looks like a question.

    • Sie lernen Deutsch. (You learn German.)
    • Lernen Sie Deutsch! (Learn German!)
    • Lernen Sie Deutsch? (Do you learn German?)

    Imperative for sein

    The verb sein (to be) is highly irregular. It even has its own imperative version:

    normal imperative
    du bist sei
    ihr seid seid
    Sie sind seien Sie

    The following sentences all mean "Please be quiet!":

    • Sei bitte ruhig! (one friend)
    • Seid bitte ruhig! (several friends)
    • Seien Sie bitte ruhig! (some person in the cinema)

    Nehmen, du nimmst??

    As mentioned before, a small number of common verbs changes the vowel in the second + third person singular.

    The change will normally be from a to ä or from e to i(e).

    nehmen geben essen lesen lassen
    ich nehme gebe esse lese lasse
    du nimmst gibst isst liest lässt
    er/sie/es nimmt gibt isst liest lässt
    wir nehmen geben essen lesen lassen
    ihr nehmt gebt esst lest lasst
    sie/Sie nehmen geben essen lesen lassen
  • 1670052469
    0.000Occupation 1100233 +5 lessons +36 lexemes0/5 •••
    Bäcker · Bäckerin · Köchin · arzt · berufes · koch · lehrer · studentes · studentinnen · ärztinnen
    10 words

    Student or Schüler?

    Ein Student is a university student and a Schüler is a pupil/student at a primary, secondary or high school. Students attending other types of schools such as language or dancing schools may also be called Schüler.

    Dropping articles

    When talking about your or someone else's profession in sentences such as I'm a teacher or She's a judge, German speakers usually drop the indefinite article (ein/eine).

    • Ich bin Lehrer. (I am a teacher.)

    It sounds more natural to say Ich bin Lehrer and Sie ist Richterin than Ich bin ein Lehrer and Sie ist eine Richterin. This rule also applies to students.

    If you add an adjective, you can't drop the article. Er ist ein schlechter Arzt (He's a bad doctor) is correct, but Er ist schlechter Arzt is not.

    Also note that you can't drop the definite article (der/die/das).

    Male and female variants

    The grammatical gender usually matches the biological sex of the person you're referring to.

    So the word that refers to a male baker is grammatically masculine, and the word that refers to a female baker is grammatically feminine.

    In the vast majority of cases, the female variant is formed by simply adding the suffix -in to the male variant, e.g. der Bäcker becomes die Bäckerin and der Schüler (the pupil) becomes die Schülerin.

    The plural of the female variant is formed by adding the ending -innen to the singular of the male variant, e.g. die Bäckerinnen and die Schülerinnen.

    Keep in mind that, in some cases, the plural comes with an umlauted stem vowel. This applies to the female variant as well.

    singular plural
    male der Koch die Köche
    female die Köchin die Köchinnen

    You learn one more word like this in this lesson:

    • der Arzt, die Ärztin (the doctor)

    Sie ist der Boss!

    There are a few words for people where the grammatical and the natural gender differ. One of them is der Boss. There is no feminine version for it, although there are certainly female bosses.

    • Mein Boss heißt Linda Ackermann.
    • Meine Chefin heißt Linda Ackermann.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Prepositions100241 +5 lessons +23 lexemes0/5 •••
    about · after · against · among · as · at · auf · aufs · behind · between · by · during · except · for · from · im · in · ins · legt · like · near · of · off · on · out · over · sitzen · to · towards · under · unter · with · without · zwischen · über
    35 words

    Prepositions

    Accusative prepositions

    Accusative prepositions always trigger the accusative case.

    Here are the most common ones: durch, für, gegen, ohne, um

    Dative prepositions

    Dative prepositions always trigger the dative case.

    Here are the most common ones: aus, außer, bei, gegenüber, mit, nach, seit, von, zu

    Two-way prepositions

    Two-way prepositions take the dative case or the accusative case, depending on the context.

    This is an unusual, but central part of German grammar.

    If there's movement from one place to another, use the accusative case.

    • Die Katze geht in die Küche. (The cat walks into the kitchen.)

    If there's no movement, or if there's movement within a certain place, use the dative case.

    • Die Katze schläft in der Küche. (The cat sleeps in the kitchen.)
    • Die Katze geht in der Küche. (The cat walks within the kitchen.)

    These prepositions can switch case: an, auf, hinter, in, neben, über, unter, vor, zwischen

    When not to think about location change

    Two-way prepositions are very common in everyday speech, so it's a good idea to practice them to fluency.

    However, don't forget that for some prepositions, you don't have to decide:

    Durch and um will always be accusative, although they might signify an activity without location change:

    • Das Kind rennt durch den Wald. (The child is running through the forest.)
    • Die Stühle stehen um den Tisch. (The chairs are standing around the table.)

    Aus, von, zu will always be dative, although they might signify a location change.

    • Er kommt aus der Küche (He comes out of the kitchen.)
    • Ich fahre zur Arbeit. (I go to work.)
    • Ich komme von der Arbeit. (I come from work.)

    Other uses for two-way prepositions

    Some verbs use one of these prepositions in a way that is not about location. This is part of language change, where things get repurposed all the time.

    Über will always trigger the accusative case:

    • Sie diskutieren über den Krieg. (They discuss the war.)

    When used with these verbs, vor will always trigger the Dative:

    • Er warnt vor dem Hund. (He warns about the dog.)

    An, in and auf are more complicated: in some verbs, they trigger the accusative, in others the dative. You'll just have to memorize these.

    • Er denkt an seinen Bruder. (He thinks of his brother.)
    • Er arbeitet an einem Film (He's working on a film.)

    • Ich warte auf den Bus. (I'm waiting for the bus.)

    • Der Film basiert auf meinem Leben. (The film is based on my life.)

    Contractions

    Some prepositions and articles can be contracted.

    an + das ans
    an + dem am
    auf + das aufs
    bei + dem beim
    in + das ins
    in + dem im
    hinter + das hinters
    über + das übers
    um + das ums
    unter + das unters
    von + dem vom
    vor + das vors
    zu + dem zum
    zu + der zur
    • Wir gehen ins Kino (We go to the cinema.)

    If you would use "that" in English, you would not use a contraction:

    • In das Kino gehe ich nicht! (I won't go into that cinema!)

    Preposition at the end of a sentence??

    An important part of German grammar is that some verbs can split off their prefix. This often ends up at the end of a sentence. Some of these prefixes look exactly like a preposition.

    So when you see a "preposition" at the end of a sentence, try to combine it with the verb. You might just have learned a new word :)

    • Sie macht die Lampe an. (anmachen means "turn on" here)

    • Ich denke nach. (nachdenken means "to think")

    • Pass auf dich auf! (aufpassen means "to take care")

    • Wann fährt der Zug ab? (abfahren means "to depart")

    • Nimm deinen Hut ab! (abnehmen means "to take off" in this context)

    Unfortunately, the way Duolingo is built does not allow to selectively teach German sentence structure. We hope this will change soon :)

    Zu Hause vs. nach Hause

    Zu Hause means at home, and nach Hause means home (homewards, not at home). The -e at the end of zu Hause and nach Hause is an archaic dative ending, which is no longer used in modern German, but survives in certain fixed expressions.

    • Ich bin zu Hause. (I am at home.)

    • Ich gehe nach Hause. (I am walking home.)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Materials100242 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    Beton · Glas · Pappe · Plastik · Sand · Wolle · hölzer · leder · papier · steinen
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Numbers 3100243 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    dritte · erste · ersten · erster · fünfte · sechste · sieben · vierte · zweite · zweiten
    10 words

    Ordinal numbers

    German ordinal numbers are pretty regular. The general rule is:

    number range ending
    1-19 -te
    > 19 -ste
    Irregular forms
    1. erste
    3. dritte
    7. siebte

    Ordinal numbers behave like adjectives, so their endings will change accordingly:

    Er kennt den ersten Sänger.

    Er ist am sechsten August geboren.

    Ich bin seine tausendste Lehrerin.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Comparisons100251 +3 lessons +26 lexemes0/3 •••
    als · große · großen · größen · größer · höher · kleine · kleiner · kleines · schöner
    10 words

    German is simpler than English! (sometimes)

    In English, there are two systems for making comparisons:

    • She is older than him.
    • Icelandic is more complicated than German.

    German only uses the first system:

    • Sie ist älter als er.
    • Isländisch ist komplizierter als Deutsch.

    This is pretty straightforward. However, quite often, the vowel of short adjectives will get an umlaut change:

    normal comparative superlative
    alt (old) älter am ältesten
    groß (big) größer am größten
    oft (often) öfter am öftesten

    You might notice that there will be an extra e in the superlative, if the word stem ends in t (or d). This is a general sound rule, just like in ich arbeite, er arbeitet.

    In addition, in some adjectives an e gets lost:

    • teuer, teurer (not teuerer), am teuersten

    Again, this is a general sound rule. You might have noticed it for euer (plural your), which becomes eure, not euere when it gets an ending.

    There is a small number of irregular forms:

    normal comparative superlative
    gut (good) besser am besten
    viel (much) mehr am meisten
    gern (to like) lieber am liebsten
    hoch (high) höher am höchsten

    Comparative adjectives are just adjectives

    Consider these examples:

    • Sie hat eine schöne Uhr.
    • Sie hat eine schönere Uhr (als ich).

    As you can see, comparative adjectives get adjective endings, just like any "normal" adjective.

    This can sometimes look a bit confusing:

    • Er ist mein junger Bruder. (He's my little brother.)
    • Er ist mein jüngerer Bruder. (He's my younger brother.)

    In the second example, the first -er is for the comparative, the second -er is the ending from der Bruder.

    If you find that really confusing, why not practice adjective endings a bit? :) You can do so in the earlier lesson "Colors".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Qualifiers100252 +2 lessons +15 lexemes0/2 •••
    bessere · besseren · beste · ganz · gute · guten · guter · sehr · super · ziemlich
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Household 2100261 +5 lessons +33 lexemes0/5 •••
    Zahnpasta · geräte · haushalte · haushaltgeräte · heizungen · raumes · reinigung · schlaf · umzüge · zähnebürsten
    10 words

    Das Handtuch (the towel) vs. das Tuch (the cloth)

    A Handtuch is a towel, not a hand towel. Of course, a towel can be a hand towel, but this does not mean that the two words are interchangeable. A pet can be a dog, but this does not mean that the words "pet" and "dog" are interchangeable.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Dates 1100263 +4 lessons +24 lexemes0/4 •••
    dienstag · donnerstages · freitagen · mittwoch · montage · tag · werktag · woche · wochenenden · wöchentlich
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Predicative 2100271 +5 lessons +33 lexemes0/5 •••
    aktiv · allgemein · automatisch · extrem · fit · hilfreich · komplett · plötzlich · regional · relativ
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Location100272 +3 lessons +14 lexemes0/3 •••
    da · dort · drinnen · drüben · hier · hinten · nebenan · oben · unten · vorne
    10 words

    Location

    Hier, da, dort

    When talking about locations in English, you can use here, there, this, and that to express that something is close or far away. In German the word da is commonly used when talking about locations. The good thing about da is, you don't have to worry about the distance! It can mean anything close or far away.

    Let's look at a few examples:

    • Wir sind da. (We are here/there.)
    • Da ist ein Apfel. (Here/There is an apple.)

    With hier (here) and dort (there) you can be more specific about the distance.

    • hier (here)
    • da (here/there)
    • dort (there)

    You can also say da oben for "up there" and so on:

    • Die Katze ist da oben. (The cat is up there.)
    • Da hinten wohnt er. (He lives there in the back.)

    Das hier

    You can combine all of them with articles, and use them similar to this and that !

    • das hier (this)
    • das da (this/that)
    • das dort (that)

    Many people use this with the other articles as well. Note that while all of the following constructs are commonly used in spoken language, they are not appropriate for written, formal language.

    • der/die/das hier (this)
    • der/die/das da (this/that)
    • der/die/das dort (that)

    To refer to one specific thing, you can put a noun between the article and hier/da/dort.

    For example:

    • Der Apfel da ist groß. (That apple is big.)
    • Die Katzen da sind süß. (Those cats are cute.)

    Some people might add drüben. This translates to over there.

    • Der Apfel da drüben ist groß. (That apple over there is big.)
    • Die Katzen dort drüben sind süß. (Those cats over there are cute.)

    Innen, drinnen

    Innen and außen mostly refer to the inside and outside of objects.

    Drinnen and draußen are normally only used for rooms (more generally, enclosed spaces that people can be in).

    • Die Wassermelone ist innen rot und außen grün. (The watermelon is red on the inside, and green on the outside.)
    • Drinnen ist es trocken, aber draußen regnet es. (Inside, it is dry, but outside it is raining.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Predicative 3100281 +4 lessons +24 lexemes0/4 •••
    abhängig · begeistert · eindeutig · notwendig · selbstverständlich · sichtbar · unabhängig · unsichtbar · verfügbar · zufrieden
    10 words

    Common adjective endings

    -ig, -lich, -isch

    Here are three common endings, which sound very similar:

    • -ig (roughly like -y in English): eindeutig, abhängig, …
    • -lich (roughly -ly in English): nützlich, möglich, persönlich, …
    • -isch (roughly -ic(al) in English): praktisch, logisch, …

    The first two sound the same in regular speech (in some dialects, all three sound the same). You already encountered this with the numbers (zwanzig).

    When you add an ending to the -ig adjectives, it will no longer sound like ch:

    • eindeutig: die eindeutige … (now sounds like g)
    • möglich: der mögliche … (still sounds like ch)

    -bar

    -bar often corresponds to "-(a)ble" in English:

    • sichtbar (visible)
    • verfügbar (available)

    Yes, there are lots of bars with joke adjective names in Germany :)

    -los, -voll

    These correspond to English "-less" and "-ful".

    • hoffnungsvoll (hopeful)
    • hoffnungslos (hopeless)

    -tion

    In English, the "-tion" ending is pronounced "-shen". In German, it always becomes "-tsion". It will always be the emphasized syllable, and the word will always be feminine.

    • Kommunikation, Lektion, Nation

    Similarly, der Patient will sound like "der Patsient".

    When nouns ending in -tion are used in an adjective, the ending -al (or -ell) will be used. The resulting adjective will be pronounced on the last syllable:

    • international, rational, kommunal, sensationell, …
  • 1670052469
    0.000Places 2100282 +4 lessons +29 lexemes0/4 •••
    Kneipe · bereichs · bundesland · flughafens · ortes · pension · platzes · regionen · unterkünfte · wohnst
    10 words

    Bundesland

    Germany is a Federal Republic (Bundesrepublik). It consists of 16 federal states, which have some degree of autonomy. These are called Bundesländer.

    Pension

    Die Pension has different meanings, depending on context. Here it means "guest house". It can also mean "retirement pay".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Medical100291 +5 lessons +26 lexemes0/5 •••
    Pflaster · Rollstuhl · bluten · formular · gesundheit · ill · krank · medikamente · patienten · praxis · sick · untersuchung
    12 words

    What is a Pflaster?

    Das Pflaster is a small adhesive bandage.

    Depending on where you live, you may call it "Band-Aid", "plaster" or "Elastoplast" in English.

    The German word Pflaster does not refer to a plaster cast. The German for plaster cast is der Gips(verband).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Present 2100292 +6 lessons +42 lexemes0/6 •••
    answers · arbeite · ask · believe · comes · consider · ends · fail · feel · follow · gehen · halten · hoffen · hope · include · includes · könnt · live · makes · mark · needs · nimmt · offer · offers · open · pass · present · raise · remember · rest · return · returns · save · schwimmen · searches · seems · shows · sign · singen · starts · stop · sucht · takes · thank · trust · weiß · wish · works
    48 words

    Wissen vs. kennen

    Wissen and kennen both translate to "to know" in English. Können (to be able to) can also mean "to know" in certain contexts.

    • Ich weiß (es) nicht. (I don't know.)
    • Ich kenne ihn nicht. (I don't know him.)
    • Ich kann ein bisschen Polnisch. (I know a bit of Polish.)

    So how to know which one to use?

    Kennen

    Kennen is used when talking about people, places and the like. It means that you are aware of its existence. Kennen needs an object.

    • Ich kenne diesen Mann nicht! (I don't know this man!)

    Wissen

    Wissen is used for knowledge about something. It usually does not have an object. Commonly, it is used with a subordinate clause ("Nebensatz"):

    • Ich weiß, wer du bist! (I know who you are.)
    • Ich weiß nicht, wann sie kommt. (I don't know when she arrives.)
    • Er weiß, dass ich ihn liebe. (He knows that I love him.)

    In rare cases, wissen can be used with an object, which might lead to very subtle situations like this:

    • Ich kenne dieses Wort nicht (I don't know this word.)
    • Ich weiß dieses Wort nicht. (I don't know this word.)

    In the first example, you have never seen this word before. In the second example, you have seen it, but you don't know what it means.

    Können

    Können generally means "be able to", and is generally used like "can/be able to" in English. The only confusing thing is that it can take a language instead of an infinitive, which English cannot:

    • Ich kann tanzen (I can dance.)
    • Ich kann Deutsch (I can speak German.)

    Conjugation of wissen

    We already used a range of verbs that change the vowel in the second and third person singular:

    person fahren lesen essen
    ich fahre lese esse
    du fährst liest isst
    er/sie/es fährt liest isst
    wir fahren lesen essen
    ihr fahrt lest esst
    sie/Sie fahren lesen essen

    You also encountered modal verbs which generally have a different vowel in singular and plural, respectively. They also have a simpler (and the same) ending in the first and third person singular.

    Wissen (to know) is a full verb. However, it is one of the very few full verbs that conjugates like a modal verb:

    pronoun wollen mögen wissen
    ich will mag weiß
    du willst magst weißt
    er/sie/es will mag weiß
    wir wollen mögen wissen
    ihr wollt mögt wisst
    sie wollen mögen wissen

    Non-stressed prefixes

    You already noticed that in German, some verb prefixes can split off:

    • ankommen — Ich komme an.
    • einkaufen — Er kauft ein.

    The general rule is: if the prefix is stressed, it splits off.

    How to know which ones are stressed?

    It might be easiest to remember those that are never stressed. The most important ones are:

    • be-, ent-, er-, ver-, zer-

    If you encounter a different prefix, guessing that it splits off will most likely be correct.

    Gefallen

    So far, you have learned two ways to say "I like".

    Mögen is used with nouns:

    • Ich mag Schokolade! (I like chocolate!)

    Gern(e) is an adverb that modifies a verb:

    • Ich esse gerne Schokolade. (I like to eat chocolate.)
    • Ich lerne gerne Deutsch. (I like to learn German.)
    • Ich kaufe gerne ein. (I like to go shopping.)

    In this lesson, you learn a third way: gefallen.

    • Er gefällt mir. (I like him.)

    What's going on?! Literally, it means "He is-pleasing to me." That's why "him" become the subject, and "I" becomes the Dative object in the example above.

    Gefallen is normally used if you like the look, sound or feel of something:

    • Die Songs gefallen mir. (I like the songs.)
    • Das Haus gefällt uns. (We like the house.)

    Like mögen, you would only use it with nouns (not with verbs).

    Legen vs. liegen

    Earlier, you learned the verb legen:

    • Ich lege den Ball auf den Tisch. (I put the ball on(to) the table.)

    Liegen is related, but defines a position:

    • Der Ball liegt auf dem Tisch (The ball is on the table.)

    Legen roughly corresponds to "lay", liegen to "lie".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Dates 2100301 +5 lessons +38 lexemes0/5 •••
    Frühling · Spargel · april · jahrs · jährlich · mai · monatlich · monats · märz · quartal
    10 words

    Monatlich

    Just as in English you have "year/yearly", German has the same word pairs. In German, some of these have an umlaut change:

    noun adjective
    das Jahr jährlich
    der Monat monatlich
    der Tag täglich
    die Stunde stündlich
    die Minute minütlich
    die Sekunde sekündlich

    Why does monatlich not change? All others are emphasized on the syllable that changes. Monatlich is emphasized on the first syllable.

    Seasons

    The seasons in German are as follows:

    English German
    spring der Frühling
    summer der Sommer
    autumn der Herbst
    winter der Winter

    Herbst sounds similar to "harvest", and Frühling has früh (early) in it.

    When you refer to seasons or months, you use im. Here's the mnemonic again that helps you remind which is which:

    • am Montag
    • um drei Uhr
    • im Juni
  • 1670052469
    0.000People 2100302 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    Jugend · bevölkerungen · einwohners · gemeinden · nutzer · paare · verbindungen · verein · verhältnisse · öffentlichkeit
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Future 1100303 +4 lessons +22 lexemes0/4 •••
    bleiben · essen · gehen · kosten · lieben · reden · vergessen · warten · wirst · wissen
    10 words

    Werden + Infinitiv = Futur

    German normally uses the present tense to indicate the future.

    • Ich gehe morgen ins Kino. (I will go to the movies tomorrow.)

    On some occasions (for example when making promises or predictions), German does use a future tense. It is very similar to the one in English.

    The future tense consists of a conjugated form of werden in the present tense and an infinitive (the base form of the verb).

    German English
    ich werde spielen I will play
    du wirst spielen you will play
    er/sie/es wird spielen he/she/it will play
    wir werden spielen we will play
    ihr werdet spielen you will play
    sie/Sie werden spielen they/you will play

    Depending on the context, ich werde spielen translates to "I will play" or "I am going to play". In German, there is no distinction between "will" and "going to".

    Be aware that the German verb wollen (to want) is a false friend of the English will:

    • Ich will spielen! (I want to play!)

    Werden has three different functions

    Using werden can be confusing for learners. However, there are clear distinctions between its three main uses:

    Werden + adjective/noun = "to become"

    If werden is used in combination with an adjective or noun, the meaning will be "to become" or "to get":

    • Sie wird Mutter. (She's becoming a mother.)
    • Ich werde müde. (I'm getting tired.)

    The German word bekommen is a confusing false friend to "become":

    • Sie bekommt eine Tochter. (She's getting a daughter.)

    Werden + Infinitiv = Futur

    This case is explained above.

    Werden + past participle = passive

    If used in combination with a participle, werden creates one type of passive:

    • Der Taxifahrer fährt den Fahrgast. (The taxi driver drives the passenger.)
    • Der Fahrgast wird gefahren. (The passenger is being driven.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Feelings100311 +6 lessons +38 lexemes0/6 •••
    angst · ernstes · freuden · lieben · liebst · nöte · späßen · träume · träumen · wunsch
    10 words

    Long and short vowels

    Which sounds are there?

    In German, every vowel can be long or short. The short one often sounds more open than the long one.

    The IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) is given for the geeks among you :) But you can also copy/paste one of these symbols into Wikipedia to get an in-depth explanation of it (with sound!).

    vowel short IPA long IPA
    a Mann /a/ Bahn /aː/
    ä Bälle /ɛ/ Käse /ɛː/
    e rennen /ɛ/ Beere /eː/
    i Mitte /ɪ/ ziehen /iː/
    o oft /ɔ/ ohne /oː/
    ö Hölle /œ/ schön /øː/
    u Mutter /ʊ/ Buch /uː/
    ü Müll /ʏ/ Bücher /yː/

    You can also google "german sounds" for a longer introduction to German sounds.

    When is a vowel short or long?

    German has a range of spelling convention which will clearly show whether a vowel is short or long:

    A vowel before a double consonant will be short:

    • Mann, denn, Mutter, Bälle, backen, Pizza, Katze

    Note that instead of "zz" (which only occurs in the Italian "Pizza"), German uses tz. Instead of "kk", we use ck.

    There are also some signals that clearly show the vowel is long.

    Sometimes, the vowel will be doubled:

    • paar, Beere, Boot, … (this only happens with a/e/o)

    There might be a silent h behind the vowel:

    • fahren, zählen, sehen, ihr, ohne, höher, Uhr, Stühle, …

    Note that if you read the list above, you should not hear a single h sound. It is geh|en, not ge|hen.

    For i, it is more common to have an -e after it (sometimes even -eh):

    • die, Biene, spielen, sieben, Beziehung, …

    Again, the h will be silent: Be|zieh|ung, not Be|zie|hung.

    But sometimes, there will not be a signal.

    The following examples have an unmarked long vowel:

    • Buch, da, Abend, wo, Not, Zitrone, …

    And here are some short ones:

    • an, Onkel, un-, Mama, Hälfte, Zitrone, …

    For these, you just have to trust your language feeling, it will normally not be a big problem :)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Time100312 +5 lessons +35 lexemes0/5 •••
    abende · dann · gestern · heute · jetzt · mittag · moment · morgen · nächte · terminen
    10 words

    Times of day

    German uses a system similar to English:

    English German
    morning der Morgen am Morgen
    - der Vormittag am Vormittag
    noon der Mittag am Mittag
    afternoon der Nachmittag am Nachmittag
    evening der Abend am Abend
    night die Nacht in der Nacht
    midnight die Mitternacht um Mitternacht

    It's generally pretty straightforward. Remember this mnemonic:

    • am Montag
    • um drei Uhr
    • im Juni

    Am Montag, am Mittag. Just "at night there are different rules": in der Nacht and um Mitternacht are irregular.

    All of these have an adverbial form:

    • morgens, vormittags, abends, nachts, …

    Morgen am Morgen?

    Similar to Spanish, the words for "tomorrow" and "morning" are the same in German. Unlike Spanish, German escapes this problem by choosing a different word when they clash.

    Instead of morgen am Morgen or morgen morgens we say morgen früh.

    Telling the time

    Official time

    In German, there are "official" and informal ways to say the time. Here's the official one (often used on radio and television):

    • dreizehn Uhr neun (literally, "thirteen o'clock nine")

    Official time uses a 24 hour system, from zero to 24.

    Don't confuse "hour" and Uhr (they are false friends):

    English German
    the hour die Stunde
    o'clock Uhr

    Die Uhr can also mean "clock" or "watch". Die Stunde can also mean "lesson" (which confusingly might not last one hour).

    Informal time

    In everyday life, people will often use informal time.

    There are several systems, with two forms dominant. In many parts of Germany, this system is used:

    Time English German
    14:05 five past two fünf nach zwei
    14:10 ten past two zehn nach zwei
    14:15 a quarter past two Viertel nach zwei
    14:20 twenty past two zwanzig nach zwei
    14:25 twenty-five past two fünf vor halb drei
    14:30 half past two halb drei
    14:35 thirty-five past two fünf nach halb drei
    14:40 twenty to three zwanzig vor drei
    14:45 a quarter to three Viertel vor drei
    14:50 ten to three zehn vor drei
    14:55 five to three fünf vor drei

    Yes, the part in the middle is very confusing :) German considers the next hour to be half full. In addition, German relates "X:25" and "X:35" to the half hour.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Frequency100321 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    größeren · häufig · male · manchmal · mehr · oft · selten · wenigen · weniger · zahlreicher
    10 words

    Ob

    Indirect questions are subordinate clauses in German:

    • Was machst du? (direct question, verb in position 2)
    • Ich weiß, was du machst! ("I know what you do!", verb at the end)

    For questions with a question word, the question word starts the sentece, and the verb ends it.

    For yes/no-questions, German uses ob as a placeholder (just like "whether" is used in English):

    • Gehst du ins Kino?
    • Er fragt, ob du ins Kino gehst.

    Je … desto …

    Je … desto … works roughly like "the … the …" in English:

    • The longer I learn German, the happier I become.
    • Je länger ich Deutsch lerne, desto glücklicher werde ich.

    However, the sentence structure is unusual, when compared to English. For the above sentence, it is:

    • je + (comparison) (subject) (rest) (verb), desto (comparison) (verb) (subject) (rest)

    The je part is a subordinate clause, so the verb will be at the end. Because the je+comparison is in the first position, the subject has to come immediately after, followed by the rest of the sentence.

    The desto part is a main clause. The verb is in position 2, and desto+comparison are in the first position. This is not unusual in German, as you can put all kinds of elements in the first position:

    Position 1 2 3 4 5
    Ich esse morgen mit einem Freund zu Mittag.
    Morgen esse ich mit einem Freund zu Mittag.
    Mit einem Freund esse ich morgen zu Mittag.
    Zu Mittag esse ich morgen mit einem Freund.

    Notice how the verb is always in the second position. The subject is either at the beginning (the default), or directly behind the verb.

    Mal

    (-)mal can often be translated with "time(s)" in English:

    German English
    zehn mal ten times
    manchmal sometimes
    das erste Mal the first time

    In addition, it has a function as a "modal particle". These are words that give a sentence an additional flavor, and can't be easily translated. Modal particles are almost never emphasized.

    • Komm mal nach Hause! (I'm impatient, come home!)
    • Kann ich mal vorbei? (Can I get through? I won't bother you for long.)

    We don't teach modal particles in this course (because you can't translate them). But you will encounter mal schauen in this lesson, which roughly means "let's see".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Modal100323 +6 lessons +42 lexemes0/6 •••
    can · cannot · could · essen · gehen · kochen · können · machen · may · must · muß · schlafen · schwimmen · sein · should · sollst · would
    17 words

    Modal verbs

    Verb forms

    You have already encountered some modal verbs earlier in the course:

    pronoun wollen mögen können
    ich will mag kann
    du willst magst kannst
    er/sie/es will mag kann
    wir wollen mögen können
    ihr wollt mögt könnt
    sie wollen mögen können

    To help remember the conjugated forms, note that modal verbs are the same in the first and third person singular.

    They also often change their vowel. The vowel in the singular will be different from the vowel of the infinitive.

    Forms of müssen, sollen, wollen, dürfen, möchten

    In this lesson, you will learn the remaining modal verbs.

    Consider these three - two new modal verbs as compared to the familiar wollen:

    pronoun müssen dürfen wollen
    ich muss darf will
    du musst darfst willst
    er/sie/es muss darf will
    wir müssen dürfen wollen
    ihr müsst dürft wollt
    sie müssen dürfen wollen

    As in können und wollen, the vowel in the singular is different. The first and third person are the same in the plural and in the singular (unlike normal verbs).

    Here are the last two new modal verbs:

    pronoun sollen möchten
    ich soll möchte
    du sollst möchtest
    er/sie/es soll möchte
    wir sollen möchten
    ihr sollt möchtet
    sie sollen möchten

    sollen does not change its vowel. Its meaning is roughly like "shall".

    möchten is unusual. It is actually the subjunctive form of "mögen", which is why it has the same ending system as subjunctive and past tense verbs. You will learn about those later in the course.

    If you remember that mögen translates to "like" in English, it makes perfect sense that its subjunctive möchten means "would like to".

    • Ich mag Pizza. (I like Pizza.)
    • Ich möchte Pizza. (I would like (to eat) Pizza.)

    How to use modal verbs

    As in English, modal verbs are combined with the infinitive of a verb:

    • Ich schwimme. Ich kann schwimmen. (I swim. I can swim.)

    Because of the peculiarity of German sentence structure, the infinitive verb will appear at the end in a normal sentence:

    • Ich muss jeden Tag arbeiten. (I have to work every day.)

    Müssen vs. dürfen

    A common problem for English speakers learning German is to use müssen right. Here's the problem:

    • Ich muss schlafen. (I must sleep.)
    • Ich muss nicht schlafen. (I don't need to sleep.)

    Actually, the problem is in English. Let's look at the same example again, but use "have to" instead:

    • Ich muss schlafen. (I have to sleep.)
    • Ich muss nicht schlafen. (I don't have to sleep.)

    As you can see, if you think "have to" instead of "must", you'll be fine.

    But how to say "must not"?

    • Ich darf nicht schlafen. (I must not sleep.)
    • Ich darf schlafen. (I'm allowed to sleep.)

    As you can see, dürfen works pretty much like "may" in English.

    • Darf ich? (May I?)
    • Nein, du darfst nicht. (No, you may not.)
    • Oh, schade.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adverbs 2100331 +4 lessons +28 lexemes0/4 •••
    allein · bereits · dabei · damit · darüber · dazu · nun · selbst · sowohl · weder
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Nature 2100332 +4 lessons +19 lexemes0/4 •••
    Bernstein · Umwelt · Welle · gräser · rhein · seen · strände · tierswelt · welt · wiesen
    10 words

    Der See vs. die See

    Der See means "the lake". Die See means "the sea, the ocean". It is less commonly used. German uses more often das Meer or der Ozean for the latter.

    Check out Bodensee and Nordsee on Google Maps and see if you can figure out which one is feminine and which one is masculine :)

    Der Strand

    Der Strand means "the beach". This meaning still survives in the English adjective "stranded" (literally, ended up on a lonely beach).

    Holz, Wald, Forst

    In English, "wood" can refer to a material, and to a forest.

    In German, Holz only refers to the material. Der Wald is "the forest". We also have a word Der Forst, but it only refers to a maintained forest (something like a garden for trees), where the trees are grown for commercial purposes.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Genitive Case100333 +2 lessons +12 lexemes0/2 •••
    Hauses · Kindes · Mannes · deiner · der · des · dieses · ihres · meiner · seiner
    10 words

    The genitive case

    The genitive case is used to indicate possession.

    • Das Fahrrad des Mannes ist schwarz. (The man's bike is black.)

    • Das Fahrrad des Kindes ist blau. (The kid's bike is blue.)

    • Das Fahrrad der Frau ist grün. (The woman's bike is green.)

    • Das Fahrrad der Männer/der Kinder/der Frauen ist rot. (The people's bike is red.)

    masc. neut. fem. plural
    nom. der das die die
    acc. den das die die
    dat. dem dem der den
    gen. des des der der

    Das Fahrrad eines Mannes ist schwarz.

    Das Fahrrad eines Kindes ist blau.

    Das Fahrrad einer Frau ist grün.

    masculine neuter feminine
    nominative ein ein eine
    accusative einen ein eine
    dative einem einem einer
    genitive eines eines einer

    Nouns

    Nouns consisting of one syllable tend to add -es in the masculine and neuter. The ending is often reduced to just -s, especially in colloquial speech.

    • der Hund, des Hundes

    Nouns consisting of more than one syllable, tend to add just -s.

    • der Computer, des Computers

    Weak nouns add -n or -en in the genitive as well (all cases but the nominative), e.g. des Jungen and des Studenten. Check the lesson "Dative Case" for a discussion of these nouns.

    Genitive phrases have a fixed word order

    You can say das Fahrrad des Kindes, but you cannot say des Kindes Fahrrad. The latter word order used to be acceptable hundreds of years ago, and you may still occasionally find it in poetry, but it’s no longer used in contemporary Standard German.

    Proper names

    In contrast to common nouns, proper names precede the noun.

    • Peters Fahrrad ist neu.

    Do not add an apostrophe unless the name already ends in -s or -z. In the latter case, the apostrophe comes at the very end of the name.

    • Hans’ Fahrrad ist alt.

    Adjectives

    Adjectives in the genitive case end in -en. The only exception are feminine and plural, without article (feminine without article is quite rare).

    preceded by an article not preceded by an article
    masculine das Fahrrad des/eines großen Mannes wegen großen Bedarfs
    feminine das Fahrrad der/einer kleinen Frau trotz großer Freude
    neuter das Fahrrad des/eines kleinen Kindes trotz ruhigen Wesens
    plural (any gender) das Fahrrad der kleinen Kinder wegen neuer Informationen

    Prepositions that take the genitive case

    The most common prepositions that take the genitive case are:

    German English
    anstatt instead of
    statt instead of
    aufgrund because of
    trotz despite
    während during
    wegen because of

    In colloquial speech, some prepositions that traditionally take the genitive tend to take the dative nowadays.

    • Trotz des Regens spielt er Fußball. (Genitive)
    • Trotz dem Regen spielt er Fußball. (Dative)

    Verbs that take the genitive case

    There’s a small set of verbs that take the genitive. Most of them are not used a lot in everyday speech and they may sound a bit stilted.

    The dative as an alternative

    As an alternative for the genitive, you can often use von followed by the dative case. Here are some examples:

    genitive dative
    der Ball der Frau der Ball von der Frau
    der Ball des Mädchens der Ball von dem Mädchen
    der Ball des Mannes der Ball von dem Mann
    der Ball der Kinder der Ball von den Kindern
    Peters Ball der Ball von Peter

    Often, the genitive case will be preferred in written language, with colloquial language going more for the dative case.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Occupation 2100341 +3 lessons +15 lexemes0/3 •••
    betreiber · empfänger · entwicklern · hersteller · händewerke · personal · schneider · teilnehmers · verfasser · werkstätten
    10 words

    Student or Schüler?

    A Student is a university student and a Schüler is a pupil/student at a primary, secondary or high school. Students attending other types of schools such as language or dancing schools may also be called Schüler.

    Dropping articles

    When talking about your or someone else's profession in sentences such as I'm a teacher or She's a judge, German speakers usually drop the indefinite article (ein/eine). It sounds more natural to say Ich bin Lehrer and Sie ist Richterin than Ich bin ein Lehrer and Sie ist eine Richterin. This rule also applies to students.

    If you add an adjective, you can't drop the article. Er ist ein schlechter Arzt (He's a bad doctor) is correct, but Er ist schlechter Arzt is not.

    Also note that you can't drop the definite article (der/die/das).

    Male and female variants

    The grammatical gender usually matches the biological sex of the person you're referring to, i.e. the word that refers to a male baker is grammatically masculine, and the word that refers to a female baker is grammatically feminine. In the vast majority of cases, the female variant is formed by simply adding the suffix -in to the male variant, e.g. der Bäcker becomes die Bäckerin and der Schüler (the pupil) becomes die Schülerin.

    The plural of the female variant is formed by adding the suffix -innen to the singular of the male variant, e.g. die Bäckerinnen and die Schülerinnen.

    Keep in mind that, in some cases, the plural comes with an umlauted stem vowel. This applies to the female variant as well, e.g. der Koch becomes die Köche and die Köchin becomes die Köchinnen.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Perfect 1100342 +6 lessons +46 lexemes0/6 •••
    behalten · erfahren · gegessen · gelernt · gelesen · geschlafen · gesehen · gespielt · hat · veröffentlicht
    10 words

    When is the Perfekt used?

    The Perfekt is used to describe past events. In spoken German, the Perfekt is preferred over the Präteritum. Using the Präteritum in normal conversation may sound unnatural or pretentious.

    • Gestern habe ich Pizza gegessen. (Yesterday, I ate pizza.)

    In contrast to the English present perfect, the German Perfekt is not used to describe events that started in the past and are still ongoing. In such cases, German speakers use the present tense:

    • Ich lebe seit drei Jahren hier. (I have been living here for three years.)

    Verbs mostly used in Präteritum

    The following verbs are normally not used in the Perfekt. Use Präteritum instead.

    English Verb Präteritum
    to be sein ich war
    to have haben ich hatte
    to know wissen ich wusste
    may dürfen ich durfte
    can können ich konnte
    must müssen ich musste
    shall sollen ich sollte
    want to wollen ich wollte

    How is Perfekt formed?

    The Perfekt is formed by combining a conjugated form of haben (to have) or sein (to be) in the present tense with the past participle of the main verb.

    • Gestern hat er nur zwei Stunden geschlafen. (Yesterday, he only slept for two hours.)

    When to use sein

    The vast majority of verbs take haben (just like in English).

    Verbs that indicate a motion normally take sein as a helper verb. Here are some common examples:

    Infinitiv Perfekt
    gehen ich bin gegangen
    laufen ich bin gelaufen
    rennen ich bin gerannt
    schwimmen ich bin geschwommen
    fliegen ich bin geflogen

    However, verbs that indicate some other change also take sein:

    Infinitiv Perfekt
    aufwachen (wake up) ich bin aufgewacht
    einschlafen (fall asleep) ich bin eingeschlafen
    sterben (die) er ist gestorben

    There are a few other verbs, for example

    • bleiben (to stay) - ich bin geblieben
    • passieren (to happen) - es ist passiert

    None of these verbs have an object (they are "intransitive"). If they have a variant with an object ("transitive"), they take haben:

    • Ich bin im Auto gefahren. (fahren: movement)
    • Ich habe das Auto gefahren. (you operate the car. The movement is secondary)
    • Ich bin Auto gefahren. (Auto is NOT an object here. It's a complement, like Deutsch lernen, similar to ein|kaufen

    How to form the participle

    Regular verbs

    Most verbs are regular (these are called "weak"). For these, creating the perfect participle is easy. Just add ge- to the front, and replace the infinitive ending with -(e)t:

    • machen - gemacht
    • arbeiten - gearbeitet
    Irregular verbs

    German has a number of irregular verbs. Most of these are "strong" verbs. For these, you add ge-, but you add -en. There might be a vowel change involved. Rarely, the change in the word stem is more drastic.

    Infinitiv Partizip II
    schlafen geschlafen
    trinken getrunken
    schwimmen geschwommen
    essen gegessen
    gehen gegangen

    While most verbs are weak, many of the most common verbs are strong.

    There is a small group of irregular verbs that follow a different system (called "mixed verbs"). Here are most of them:

    Infinitiv Partizip II
    wissen gewusst
    rennen gerannt
    brennen gebrannt
    kennen gekannt
    denken gedacht
    bringen gebracht
    Why is there no ge-? Why is it inside the participle?

    Once you have the correct form of the basic verb, here are two more rules you need to know:

    German verbs have two kinds of prefixes. Some can split off. These are always emphasized:

    • (einkaufen) Ich kaufe im Supermarkt ein.

    Verbs like this will have the -ge- between the prefix and the verb stem:

    • Ich habe im Supermarkt eingekauft.
    • Ich bin im Bus eingeschlafen.

    Here are some common prefixes that are always emphasized:

    • ab-, an-, auf-, aus-, bei-, ein-, mit-, nach-, vor-, zu-

    Other prefixes are not emphasized. They never split off. For these (and any other verbs that are not emphasized on the first syllable), do not add a ge- prefix. This includes all verbs that end in -ieren (as these are emphasized at the -ie-).

    • (verkaufen) Ich verkaufe mein Auto
    • Ich habe mein Auto verkauft.
    • Ich habe gestern verschlafen.
    • Er hat Musik studiert.

    These prefixes are never emphasized:

    • be-, ent-, er-, ge-, ver-, zer-

    A few prefixes might be emphasized or not.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Nominative 1100351 +6 lessons +37 lexemes0/6 •••
    aktuelle · eigener · größte · größten · höheren · letzter · müde · neuen · speziellen · öffentliche
    10 words

    Adjective endings

    When an adjective comes before a noun, its ending will change according to this noun.

    • Die Katze ist alt.

    • Das ist eine alte Katze.

    Article + Adjective

    You can think of the adjective endings as "markers", that kind of mark what part of speech the adjective belongs to.

    Nominative

    Remember that the nominative case is used for the subject of a sentence. These are the nominative adjectives:

    gender article adjective noun
    masc. der rote Hut
    ein roter Hut
    neut. das rote Hemd
    ein rotes Hemd
    fem. die rote Rose
    eine rote Rose
    Plural die roten Schuhe
    keine roten Schuhe
    - rote Schuhe

    While that might look a bit chaotic, there is not so much going on:

    1) Masculine: Either the article, or the adjective must have the -r ending. The same goes for neuter and -s

    • Der kleine Hund spielt.
    • Ein kleiner Hund spielt.

    2) Feminine and Plural end in -e. If you add an article, you also have to add an -n.

    • Die alte Katze schläft.
    • Alte Katzen schlafen.
    • Die alten Katzen schlafen.
    • Das sind keine alten Katzen.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Accusative100353 +6 lessons +41 lexemes0/6 •••
    detaillierte · deutschen · ganzen · langen · neue · neuen · neues · nächsten · verfügbaren · verschiedenen
    10 words

    Accusative adjective endings

    Do you remember that quite often, the accusative looks like the nominative? Specifically, only the articles for masculine nouns change.

    The same goes for the adjectives. They are the same as for nominative; the only exception is for masculine nouns. The changes are marked in bold in the table below.

    3) masculine accusative: adjective ends in -en

    • Die alte Katze schläft. Der alte Mann sieht die alte Katze (no change)
    • Die alte Katze sieht den alten Mann.
    gender article adjective noun
    masc. den roten Hut
    einen roten Hut
    neut. das rote Hemd
    ein rotes Hemd
    fem. die rote Rose
    eine rote Rose
    Plural die roten Schuhe
    keine roten Schuhe
    - rote Schuhe
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Dative100361 +2 lessons +13 lexemes0/2 •••
    alten · bekannten · deutschen · gesamten · heutigen · persönlichen · privaten · schenken · vergangenen · zweiten
    10 words

    Please refer to the previous lessons on adjectives about the endings for nominative and accusative.

    Dative

    Dative, as always, is even simpler.

    4) Dative: all adjectives get an -en ending

    gender article adjective noun
    masc. dem roten Hut
    einem roten Hut
    neut. dem roten Hemd
    einem roten Hemd
    fem. der roten Rose
    einer roten Rose
    Plural den roten Schuhen
    keinen roten Schuhen
    - roten Schuhen

    Remember that in dative,

    • masculine/neuter articles end in -m
    • feminine articles end in -r
    • plural articles end in -n
    • and plural nouns (almost) always end in -n.

    Here are some examples:

    • Der Mann mit dem roten Hemd (the man in the red shirt)
    • Sie mag Männer mit roten Haaren (She likes men with red hair)

    When do dative adjectives not end in -n?

    There is a rather rare case when dative adjectives do not end in -en.

    Rarely, single nouns will be used without any article. This mostly happens in idiomatic expressions.

    • mit heißer Feder (with hot feather)
    • mit großem Eifer (with great verve)

    What happens here is that the ending that would normally be used in the article now ends up on the adjective.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Direction100362 +4 lessons +21 lexemes0/4 •••
    her · heraus · herein · herum · hierher · hin · hinaus · raus · rechts · rein
    10 words

    Weg vs. weg

    Der Weg" (with a long e*) roughly means "the path".

    • Der Weg ist lang. (The path is long.)

    Weg (with a short, open e) roughly means "away".

    Here are some examples:

    • Geh weg! (Go away!)
    • Ich bin weg! (I'm gone!)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adjectives: Nominative 2100371 +6 lessons +40 lexemes0/6 •••
    externe · gelber · höchste · möglichen · persönliche · starke · starken · unterschiedliche · wichtige · zusätzliche
    10 words

    Nominative

    Remember that nominative is used for the subject of a sentence. These are the nominative adjectives:

    gender article adjective noun
    masc. der rote Hut
    ein roter Hut
    neut. das rote Hemd
    ein rotes Hemd
    fem. die rote Rose
    eine rote Rose
    Plural die roten Schuhe
    keine roten Schuhe
    - rote Schuhe

    While that might look a bit chaotic, there is not so much going on:

    1) masculine: Either the article, or the adjective must have the -r ending. The same goes for neuter and -s.

    • Der kleine Hund spielt.
    • Ein kleiner Hund spielt.

    2) Feminine and Plural end in -e. If you add an article, you also have to add an -n.

    • Die alte Katze schläft.
    • Alte Katzen schlafen.
    • Die alten Katzen schlafen.
    • Das sind keine alten Katzen.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adverbs 3100373 +4 lessons +27 lexemes0/4 •••
    also · ansonsten · dafür · denn · eigentlich · mal · natürlich · soweit · wohl · übrigens
    10 words

    Trotzdem vs. obwohl

    Obwohl translates to "although", while trotzdem translates to "however/nevertheless".

    • Ich bin müde, obwohl ich Kaffee getrunken habe. (I'm tired, although I drank coffee.)
    • Ich habe Kaffee getrunken. Trotzdem bin ich müde. (I drank coffee. Nevertheless, I'm tired.)

    Trotzdem is an adverb. It is part of a sentence and will replace the subject if it appears in the first position.

    Obwohl is a subordinating conjunction. It will send the verb to the last position. See the lesson "Conjunctions" for more details.

    Darum, deshalb, deswegen

    These three adverbs are synonymous. They can be used interchangeably.

    The conjunctions weil and denn are used in the form "Statement, weil/denn Reason".

    • Ich bin müde, weil ich nicht geschlafen habe. (subordinating conjunction)
    • Ich bin müde, denn ich habe nicht geschlafen. (coordinating conjunction)

    Darum and its sisters are used in the form "Reason, darum Statement" (or "Statement, darum Result").

    • Ich habe nicht geschlafen. Darum bin ich müde.

    Womit? Damit!

    Many prepositions can be combined with wo- and da-. Da roughly translates to "that" here, wo normally to "what" (not "where" which is its normal meaning).

    wo- da-
    woran daran
    worauf darauf
    woraus daraus
    wobei dabei
    wodurch dadurch
    wofür dafür
    wogegen dagegen
    wohinter dahinter
    worin darin
    womit damit
    wonach danach
    worum darum
    worüber darüber
    worunter darunter
    wovon davon
    wovor davor
    wozu dazu
    wozwischen dazwischen

    If the preposition starts with a vowel, there will be a binding r. So worum is pronounced "wo-rum", not "wor-um".

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Preterite100381 +6 lessons +42 lexemes0/6 •••
    aßen · begannst · dachte · gingst · kamen · sah · schwammen · trank · vorher · warst
    10 words

    When is the Präteritum used?

    The Präteritum (also called Imperfekt) is used to describe past events. Its use is mostly limited to formal writing and formal speech. In informal writing and speech, the Perfekt (e.g. Ich habe geschlafen) tends to be preferred. Using the Präteritum in normal conversation may sound unnatural or pretentious.

    Verbs mostly used in Präteritum

    The following verbs are normally not used in the Perfekt. Use Präteritum instead.

    English Verb Präteritum
    to be sein ich war
    to have haben ich hatte
    to know wissen ich wusste
    may dürfen ich durfte
    can können ich konnte
    must müssen ich musste
    shall sollen ich sollte
    want to wollen ich wollte

    Möchten

    The verb möchten (would like to/to want to), which is technically the subjunctive of mögen, does not have a preterite form. Instead, the preterite of wollen (to want [to]) is used.

    How is the Präteritum formed?

    Regular weak verbs

    The Präteritum of regular weak verbs is formed by adding -(e)te, -(e)test, -(e)ten, or -(e)tet to the stem.

    sagen (to say)

    Present Präteritum
    ich sage (I say) ich sagte (I said)
    du sagst (you say) du sagtest (you said)
    er/sie/es sagt (he/she/it says) er/sie/es sagte (he/she/it said)
    wir sagen (we say) wir sagten (we said)
    ihr sagt (you say) ihr sagtet (you said)
    sie/Sie sagen (they/you say) sie/Sie sagten (they/you said)

    Irregular weak verbs

    Some weak verbs, although generally regular, have a slightly irregular verb stem in the Präteritum. These are mostly modal verbs. Be sure not to use the umlaut in the Präteritum for these, as that will change it to the Konjunktiv II (subjunctive) mood.

    The endings will be the same as for other weak verbs.

    • haben - ich hatte, du hattest, …
    • können - ich konnte, du konntest, …
    • müssen - ich musste, du musstest, …
    • dürfen - ich durfte, du durftest, …

    Strong verbs

    To form the Präteritum of strong verbs, you need to find the modified verb stem first. Google "German irregular verbs" to get a list.

    To this modified stem, you add the following endings:

    Person Ending
    ich -
    du -st
    er/sie/es -
    wir -en
    ihr -t
    sie/Sie -en

    Notice that these are the same endings as for the modal verbs in the present tense. First and third person are the same in singular and plural.

    finden (to find)

    Present Präteritum
    ich finde (I find) ich fand (I found)
    du findest (you find) du fandest (you found)
    er/sie/es findet (he/she/it finds) er/sie/es fand (he/she/it found)
    wir finden (we find) wir fanden (we found)
    ihr findet (you find) ihr fandet (you found)
    sie/Sie finden (they/you find) sie/Sie fanden (they/you found)

    sein (to be)

    Present Präteritum
    ich bin (I am) ich war (I was)
    du bist (you are) du warst (you were)
    er/sie/es ist (he/she/it is) er/sie/es war (he/she/it was)
    wir sind (we are) wir waren (we were)
    ihr seid (you are) ihr wart (you were)
    sie/Sie sind (they/you are) sie/Sie waren (they/you were)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Weather100383 +3 lessons +16 lexemes0/3 •••
    Schnee · Sturm · grad · nass · regen · regnet · scheint · schneit · trocken · wetters
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Objects100391 +2 lessons +11 lexemes0/2 •••
    böden · kataloge · pakete · pläne · produkte · sachen · scheren · scissors · stelle · stück · through · tv · zubehöre
    13 words

    Hose, Schere, Brille

    Pants used to be two hoses, until somebody had the idea of stitching them together. Glasses are now joined into one object. If you deconstruct scissors into multiple objects, you have two awkward knives and a screw.

    German uses the singular for all of these. Die Hose is "a pair of pants". Die Hosen (plural) is at least two pairs of pants.

    Stelle

    Die Stelle has the meaning of "position" in at least two ways. It can be a location, or it can be a job position.

    Geschenk, Gift

    The common German word German for "gift" is das Geschenk. Das Gift means "poison". The reason is that a long time ago, "gift" in the meaning of "something that is given" was used as an euphemism for poison.

    • "Why did he die?"
    • "Kunigunde gave him something."

    The original meaning survives in the word die Mitgift (dowry).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Communication 1100393 +4 lessons +27 lexemes0/4 •••
    Vorwahl · computers · festplatten · gespräches · handys · information · kommunikationen · monitore · rufen · telefon
    10 words

    Phones and cellphones

    Believe it or not, people still use landline phones, especially in business contexts. A (tele)phone can be a cellphone or a landline phone. The word (tele)phone is to the word cellphone what the word pet is to the word dog, i.e. generic vs. specific.

    • the tele(phone) = das Telefon

    • the cellphone (the mobile phone) = das Handy / das Mobiltelefon

    Regardless of whether you always refer to your cellphone as a phone, in this course, you will not be able to use (tele)phone/Telefon and cellphone/Handy interchangeably.

    Rufen, anrufen

    Rufen translates to "call":

    • Ich rufe meinen Hund. (I call my dog.)

    The word used for calling via phone is anrufen:

    • Ich rufe meinen Bruder an. (I call my brother.)

    Because people used to call the police long before phones existed, German uses rufen for this:

    • Ich ruf(e) die Polizei!!

    Informationen

    Unlike English, the German word die Information has a singular and a plural form.

    Fernseher, Fernsehen

    Der Fernseher refers to a TV set. Das Fernsehen refers to TV in general.

    • Ich habe gestern einen Fernseher gekauft. (I bought a TV yesterday.)
    • Ich bin im Fernsehen! (I'm on TV!)

    "Ich bin im Fernseher!" would mean "I'm inside the TV set!".

    Fernsehen, frühstücken

    • Ich sehe fern. Ich habe ferngesehen.
    • Ich frühstücke. Ich habe gefrühstückt.

    Why does one split, but not the other?

    Sehen is interpreted as a verb by itself. Thus, fern is interpreted as the prefix. Because it is emphasized, it will split off. Because it splits off, the -ge- of the participle will end up inside the word.

    Stücken is not a verb. Frühstücken is a verb that was created from the noun das Frühstück. Hence, the first syllable, although emphasized, will not split off.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Future 2100401 +5 lessons +34 lexemes0/5 •••
    abbrechen · anbieten · aufgeben · beantworten · behalten · benötigen · nachfragen · prüfen · vorschlagen · wenden
    10 words

    Werden + Infinitiv = Futur

    German normally uses the present tense to indicate the future.

    • Ich gehe morgen ins Kino. (I will go to the movies tomorrow.)

    On some occasions (for example when making promises or predictions), German does use a future tense. It is very similar to the one in English.

    The future tense consists of a conjugated form of werden in the present tense and an infinitive (the base form of the verb).

    German English
    ich werde spielen I will play
    du wirst spielen you will play
    er/sie/es wird spielen he/she/it will play
    wir werden spielen we will play
    ihr werdet spielen you will play
    sie/Sie werden spielen they/you will play

    Depending on the context, ich werde spielen translates to "I will play" or "I am going to play". In German, there is no distinction between "will" and "going to".

    Be aware that the German verb wollen (to want) is a false friend of the English "will":

    • Ich will spielen! (I want to play!)

    Werden has three different functions

    Using werden can be confusing for learners. However, there are clear distinctions between its three main uses:

    Werden + adjective/noun = "to become"

    If werden is used in combination with an adjective or noun, the meaning will be "to become" or "to get":

    • Sie wird Mutter. (She's becoming a mother.)
    • Ich werde müde. (I'm getting tired.)

    The German word bekommen is a confusing false friend to "become":

    • Sie bekommt eine Tochter. (She's getting a daughter.)

    Werden + Infinitiv = Futur

    This case is explained above.

    Werden + past participle = passive

    If used in combination with a participle, werden creates one type of passive:

    • Der Taxifahrer fährt den Fahrgast. (The taxi driver drives the passenger.)
    • Der Fahrgast wird gefahren. (The passenger is being driven.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Internet & Social Media100402 +4 lessons +28 lexemes0/4 •••
    Wlan · fotos · internet · internetsseiten · läd · netz · netzeswerke · seite · suche · suchmaschinen
    10 words

    Die Seite

    Die Seite can mean "the side" or "the page", depending on context.

    • Ich stehe auf der anderen Seite. (I am standing on the other side.)
    • Ich lese die Seite. (I read the page.)

    In the context of the internet, it refers to a web page, as well as to a web site.

    WLAN

    WLAN is pronounced [ˈveːlaːn] in German. Unfortunately, the computer voice of the German course refuses to acknowledge this, and insists on pronouncing it wrong.

    Drucken vs. drücken

    Drucken means "to print". The machine commonly used for that is der Drucker.

    • Ich muss noch zehn Seiten drucken! (I have to print ten more pages!)

    Drücken means "to press". Der Drücker may refer to an electric button, or to a hug.

    • Der Drücker am Aufzug ist kaputt. (The button of the lift is broken.)
    • Drücker! (Hugs!)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Past Perfect100411 +1 lesson +8 lexemes0/1 •••
    behalten · erfahren · gegessen · genannt · geprüft · hatten · nachdem · verlassen
    8 words

    Past perfect

    When is the past perfect used?

    The past perfect is used to describe past events, more specifically events that happened way back in the past or any time before another event in the past.

    past perfect preterite
    Ich hatte ihn schon gesehen, als er mich sah
    I had already seen him when he saw me

    How is the past perfect formed?

    The past perfect is formed almost the same way as the Perfekt. The only difference is that the helper verb will be in the past tense:

    • Ich habe gegessen. (I have eaten.)
    • Ich hatte gegessen. (I had eaten.)

    • Ich bin geschwommen. (I have swum.)

    • Ich war geschwommen. (I had swum.)

    How to end up with the right participle?

    Refer to the "Perfect" lesson in order to review how to form the perfect participle that goes with it.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Education100412 +4 lessons +29 lexemes0/4 •••
    bildung · forschungen · gründeschule · leser · meaning · note · stifts · studies · studium · teaching · testen · training · universitäten · übung
    14 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Future Perfect100413 +2 lessons +10 lexemes0/2 •••
    gefahren · gegangen · gegessen · gekauft · gelesen · gesagt · geschlossen · haben · sein · wird
    10 words

    Future Perfect

    The future perfect talks about actions that will have been completed in the future. It's used pretty much like the English future perfect, but it's formed slightly differently.

    The future perfect consists of the future tense of the auxiliary verb haben or sein, and the past participle of the main verb.

    Haben vs. sein

    The vast majority of verbs take haben. Verbs that take sein have to be intransitive, i.e. they can't take an object, and they have to indicate a change of position or condition. sein (to be), bleiben (to stay), and passieren (to happen) take sein even though they don't indicate a change of position or condition.

    Please refer to the "Perfect" lesson to review how to form the participle, and for more details on when to use haben or sein.

    Future Perfect with haben

    essen (to eat):

    The auxiliary verb that goes with essen is haben. All you need to do is form the future tense of haben (ich werde haben) and add the past participle of the main verb essen (gegessen) to the left of haben.

    German English
    ich werde gegessen haben I will have eaten
    du wirst gegessen haben you will have eaten
    er/sie/es wird gegessen haben he/she/it will have eaten
    wir werden gegessen haben we will have eaten
    ihr werdet gegessen haben you will have eaten
    sie werden gegessen haben they will have eaten
    Sie werden gegessen haben you will have eaten

    Future Perfect with sein

    gehen (to leave/to go):

    The auxiliary verb that goes with gehen is sein. All you need to do is form the future tense of sein (ich werde sein) and add the past participle of the main verb gehen (gegangen) to the left of sein.

    German English
    ich werde gegangen sein I will have left
    du wirst gegangen sein you will have left
    er/sie/es wird gegangen sein he/she/it will have left
    wir werden gegangen sein we will have left
    ihr werdet gegangen sein you will have left
    sie werden gegangen sein they will have left
    Sie werden gegangen sein you will have left
  • 1670052469
    0.000Common Phrases 2100421 +1 lesson +3 lexemes0/1 •••
    Ahnung · Verzeihung · naja
    3 words

    Naja, na und, na sowas

    Na appears in some short interjections or phrases:

    Example English
    naja "Was ist das Problem?" — "Naja, dein Hund stinkt." Well…
    na und "Dein Hund stinkt." — "Na und?" so what?
    na klar "Stinkt dein Hund?" — "Na klar!" of course!
    na sowas "Dein Hund tanzt" — "Na sowas!" Oh wow!
  • 1670052469
    0.000Science100422 +5 lessons +33 lexemes0/5 •••
    Achtung · Physik · Strahlung · alcohol · decrease · definition · discover · electric · energie · erfindung · kenntnis · temperaturen · theorie · wissenschaften
    14 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Reflexive100431 +4 lessons +31 lexemes0/4 •••
    befindest · ergabt · freust · fühlen · haben · interessiert · lohne · sich · uns · wirst
    10 words

    Reflexive verbs

    Reflexive verbs are pretty common in many European languages, but in comparison are rather rare in English:

    • He hurt himself.
    • She found herself.

    In German, they are more frequent. Sometimes, they make perfect sense:

    • Ich wasche mich. ("I wash myself", as opposed to my dog)

    But often, the reason for using this form is lost in history, and the verb just has to be learned as is:

    • Ich befinde mich im Garten. ("I'm in the garden", literally "I find myself in the garden")
    • Sie setzt sich hin. ("She sits down", lit. "She seats herself")
    • Ich erinnere mich nicht. ("I don't remember" (myself))

    Verb objects

    Remember that verbs often have a "direct object". This will be in the accusative case:

    • Der Mann isst einen Apfel.

    Some verbs have an additional "indirect object", which will be in the dative case:

    • Der Mann gibt dem Kind einen Apfel. (The man gives an apple to the child.)

    The reflexive pronoun will take the place of one of these objects.

    Replacing the "lost" object

    Because the reflexive part takes up the object, some reflexive verbs need a preposition to go with them. This preposition has to be learned together with the verb.

    • sich interessieren für (to have an interest in)
    • sich freuen auf (to look forward to)
    • sich freuen über (to be happy about)
    • sich kümmern um (to care for)
    • sich treffen mit (to meet with)

    Accusative reflexive verbs

    In most reflexive verbs, the direct object gets replaced by the reflexive pronoun. Thus, use the accusative versions.

    • Ich rasiere mich. ("I shave", literally "I shave myself")

    Dative reflexive verbs

    If the verb already has a direct (accusative) object, the reflexive pronoun will be in the dative case:

    First, consider this example (mich is in the accusative):

    • Ich wasche mich. (I wash, literally "I wash myself")

    In the next example, "die Haare" is the Accusative object. Hence, the reflexive pronoun is in the dative ("mir"):

    • Ich wasche mir die Haare. ("I wash my hair", literally "I wash the hairs to myself")

    Here are some verbs with dative reflexive pronouns:

    • Ich wünsche mir einen Hund. (I wish for a dog.)
    • Ich sehe mir den Film an. (I watch the movie.)
    • Ich habe mir das Bein gebrochen. (I broke my leg.)

    Reflexive pronouns

    Here is a review of the normal pronouns:

    nom. acc. dat.
    ich mich mir
    du dich dir
    er/sie/es ihn/sie/es ihm/ihr/ihm
    wir uns uns
    ihr euch euch
    sie/Sie sie/Sie ihnen/Ihnen

    Notice that for wir and ihr, accusative and dative do not differ.

    Here are the accusative and dative reflexive pronouns:

    nom. acc. refl. dat. refl.
    ich mich mir
    du dich dir
    er/sie/es sich sich
    wir uns uns
    ihr euch euch
    sie/Sie sich sich

    The reflexive pronoun for the third person (singular and plural) is sich. Otherwise, they don't differ from their non-reflexive counterparts.

    This means that if you see a sentence such as:

    • Er wäscht ihm die Füße.

    It must be a different person: He washes the feet of somebody else. If it were his own feet, the sentence would be:

    • Er wäscht sich die Füße.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Communication 2100432 +4 lessons +25 lexemes0/4 •••
    Briefkasten · Post · adressen · anreden · brief · gruß · notiz · postkarten · postleitzahlen · senden
    10 words

    Post

    Die Post has several meanings in German.

    It can refer to the mail in your mailbox:

    • Ist die Post schon da? (Has the mail arrived yet?)

    It can also refer to the post office:

    • Gehst du heute zur Post? (Are you going to the post office today?)

    Or, it can refer to the mail company (which used to be state run in Germany):

    • Die Post hat die Gebühren erhöht. (The mail company raised their fees.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Business 1100441 +5 lessons +33 lexemes0/5 •••
    Arbeit+erlaubnis · aktie · bietest · büros · fabriken · gebote · inhaber · mitgliedschaften · organisation · unternehmen
    10 words

    Fabrik

    Don't confuse die Fabrik (the manufacturing plant) with the English word "fabric". The former is the place where something is fabricated, the latter is the fabricated product of the world's first manufacturing plants (hence the name).

    In addition, die Fabrik is stressed on the last syllable.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Language100443 +5 lessons +29 lexemes0/5 •••
    bedeutungen · beschreibung · geschichten · händebuche · idee · schriften · sprache · wortbücher · worten · zustimmungen
    10 words

    Geschichte

    In German, the words for "story" and "history" are the same (just as in Spanish).

    However, they are used differently. When used with an article, it generally refers to a story:

    • Hast du die Geschichte gelesen? (Did you read the story?)

    Most of the time, when referring to history, there won't be an article:

    • Ich habe Geschichte studiert. (I studied history at university.)

    In addition, only "story" will have a plural version:

    • Er erzählt lustige Geschichten. (He tells funny stories.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Abstract Objects 1100451 +4 lessons +28 lexemes0/4 •••
    auswahl · drucks · formen · gebräuche · hinweis · lösungen · problem · verhalten · ziele · änderung
    10 words

    Drucken vs. drücken

    Drucken means "to print". The machine commonly used for that is der Drucker.

    • Ich muss noch zehn Seiten drucken! (I have to print ten more pages!)

    • Der Drucker ist kaputt! (The printer is broken!)

    Drücken means "to press". Der Drücker may refer to an electric button, or to a hug.

    • Der Drücker am Aufzug ist kaputt. (The button of the lift is broken.)
    • Drücker! (Hugs!)

    Slightly confusingly, der Druck can refer to "pressure", but also to a "print".

    • Mach keinen Druck! (Don't create stress!)
    • Der Druck ist schön. (The print is nice.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Animals 2100452 +5 lessons +34 lexemes0/5 •••
    Eichhörnchen · Eis+bär · Eule · Fuchs · Gans · Pinguin · Schaf · Schmetterling · Zoo · beißen
    10 words

    Affen

    In German, der Affe may refer to all primates, or to all primates excluding lemurs.

    In everyday English, "apes" tend to be distinguished from other primates, most of which are referred to as "monkeys". German does not make this distinction. If you want to refer to apes only, you can use the word Menschenaffen.

    Kamele

    Das Kamel is stressed on the last syllable: [kaˈmeːl]. Unfortunately, Duolingo's computer voice has other ideas about this. When you're in Cologne, don't confuse these adorable, but weighty animals with Kamelle ([kaˈmɛlə], caramels traditionally thrown around during Karneval).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Present 3100453 +7 lessons +56 lexemes0/7 •••
    adds · agree · allows · announce · appears · arrive · asks · assumes · begins · believes · bittet · calls · contains · continues · counts · creates · cuts · definieren · deliver · delivers · demands · dry · explains · feels · fill · finds · fits · fly · follows · gets · gives · helps · import · introduce · knows · leaves · lernen · lesen · lives · looks · meldest · merken · mix · nennen · opens · presents · produces · put · puts · receives · redet · reserve · reserves · respect · serves · sets · sichere · signs · sing · spend · springt · supports · talks · tells · thinks · tries · uses · visits · watches · wins · wishes
    71 words

    Telefonieren, anrufen

    Telefonieren does not have an object (it is "intransitive"). Hence, you need a preposition for the other person:

    • Ich telefoniere mit meiner Mutter. (I'm on the phone with my mother.)

    On the other hand, anrufen has an accusative object:

    • Ich rufe meine Mutter an. (I call my mother.)

    Remember that for the police, you would use rufen (without the an-):

    • Ruf die Polizei! (Call the police!)

    Wechseln, tauschen

    Tauschen generally means to swap, or to change something:

    • Komm, wir tauschen unsere Hüte! (Come, we swap our hats!)

    Austauschen or (aus)wechseln mean to exchange/substitute:

    • Er tauscht die Batterien aus. (He exchanges the batteries.)
    • Er wechselt die Batterien (aus).

    Wechseln by itself can also mean "to switch/change":

    • Er wechselt den Fußballverein. (He switches the soccer club.)
    • Er wechselt die Socken. (He changes his socks.)

    This is also the word used for changing money:

    • Ich muss noch Geld wechseln. (I have to change money first.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Body 2100461 +4 lessons +25 lexemes0/4 •••
    Bauch · Brust+korb · Daumen · Gehirn · Hand+gelenk · Kinn · Lippe · Lunge · Stirn · Zunge
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Future 3100462 +5 lessons +38 lexemes0/5 •••
    abgeben · drucken · drücken · geben · kaufen · schwimmen · springen · verändern · wandern · zahlen
    10 words

    Drucken vs. drücken

    Drucken means "to print". The machine commonly used for that is der Drucker.

    • Ich muss noch zehn Seiten drucken! (I have to print ten more pages!)

    • Der Drucker ist kaputt! (The printer is broken!)

    Drücken means "to press". Der Drücker may refer to an electric button, or to a hug.

    • Der Drücker am Aufzug ist kaputt. (The button of the lift is broken.)
    • Drücker! (Hugs!)

    Slightly confusingly, der Druck can refer to "pressure", but also to a "print".

    • Mach keinen Druck! (Don't create stress!)
    • Der Druck ist schön. (The print is nice.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Spiritual100471 +3 lessons +16 lexemes0/3 •••
    Schicksal · Spiritualität · Wunder · gefühlen · geist · hoffnungen · leben · meditieren · seelen · sinne
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Conditional100472 +6 lessons +41 lexemes0/6 •••
    falls · handeln · könnten · könntet · lösen · nennen · sprechen · würden · würdest · zählen
    10 words

    Conditional mood

    The conditional mood is mostly used for wishes or unreal situations.

    • I wish I had a parrot!
    • If I were you, I would sleep more.

    Use würde for most verbs

    Where English uses would, German uses forms of würde:

    German English
    ich würde spielen I would play
    du würdest spielen you would play
    er/sie/es würde spielen he/she/it would play
    wir würden spielen we would play
    ihr würdet spielen you would play
    sie/Sie würden spielen they/you would play

    Some verbs have their own forms

    Sometimes, English uses special forms for the Conditional. These generally look like Simple Past forms:

    • Yesterday, I had a dream.
    • I wish I had a dream.

    In German, these two forms are also similar. However, German normally adds an umlaut change (and occasional -e):

    person Präteritum Conditional
    ich war wäre
    du warst wär(e)st
    er/sie/es war wäre
    wir waren wären
    ihr wart wär(e)t
    sie/Sie waren wären

    Apart from the sein, haben and the modal verbs, only a few verbs are still conjugated directly. For most verbs, this is now unusual, and considered old-fashioned. Use würde + infinitive instead.

    To show you the pattern, here are the forms for haben (to have), dürfen (may) and geben (to give):

    person haben dürfen geben
    (Präteritum: ich) (hatte) (durfte) (gab)
    ich hätte dürfte gäbe
    du hättest dürftest gäbst
    er/sie/es hätte dürfte gäbe
    wir hätten dürften gäben
    ihr hättet dürftet gäbt
    sie/Sie hätten dürften gäben

    For the other modal verbs, the forms for ich are:

    • müssen - müsste
    • wollen - wollte (no umlaut change!)
    • sollen - sollte (also no umlaut change)

    Here are some other verbs that use their own form for the Conditional:

    • gehen (to go) - ginge
    • wissen (to know) - wüsste
    • wünschen (to wish) - wünschte
    • tun (to do) - täte
    • brauchen (to need) - bräuchte

    Again, for most other verbs, use würde + infinitive.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Math100481 +1 lesson +4 lexemes0/1 •••
    geteilt durch · gleich · minus · plus
    4 words

    Equals

    There are several ways to talk about equations:

    • Vier plus drei macht sieben.
    • Zwei plus zwei ist vier.
    • Eins plus fünf (ist) gleich sechs.
    • Sieben plus acht ergibt fünfzehn.

    These are all equivalent (ha!).

  • 1670052469
    0.000Banking100483 +2 lessons +9 lexemes0/2 •••
    beträge · finanzierung · frist · konti · krediteskarte · münzen · rechnung · zahlung · zinse
    9 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Abstract Objects 2100490 +6 lessons +41 lexemes0/6 •••
    basen · bestimmung · erfahrung · kategorien · kräfte · planungen · unterschieden · unterstützungen · verbesserungen · versionen
    10 words

    Party, Partei

    Die Party, an English loanword, refers to a celebration.

    A political party will be die Partei.

  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Conditional Perfect100492 +2 lessons +10 lexemes0/2 •••
    behalten · beraten · erfahren · gekommen · geprüft · gesagt · gewesen · hättest · verlassen · veröffentlicht
    10 words

    Conditional Perfect

    Conditional Perfect works just as normal Perfect, but uses the conditional form of haben instead. So,

    • Ich habe ihn gesehen.

    becomes

    • Ich hätte ihn gesehen.

    For verbs that use sein instead, use the conditional form of sein:

    • Ich bin Auto gefahren.

    becomes

    • Ich wäre Auto gefahren.

    Be aware that in some verbs, such as behalten, verlassen, erfahren, the Participle looks like the Infinitive. Don't let that confuse you, always use the Participle!

  • 1670052469
    0.000Business 2100501 +5 lessons +34 lexemes0/5 •••
    anzeigen · aufträge · chance · firmen · industrie · lieferung · tabelle · verkaufes · versicherung · ware
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs Future 4100502 +4 lessons +28 lexemes0/4 •••
    auswählen · benutzen · bringen · ermöglichen · festlegen · hören · leisten · verbessern · öffnen · übernehmen
    10 words

    The power of machen

    Machen (to do) is a very versatile word. Often, when you don't know the word for an action, you can somehow use machen do describe it. Often, there is even an existing word combination:

    Here are some examples. The "higher-level" word is in brackets.

    • aufmachen (öffnen) — to open
    • zumachen (schließen) — to close
    • besser machen (verbessern) — to improve
    • wegmachen (entfernen) — to remove

    As a fallback, it can help you to just continue speaking, even when you run the risk making up your own words:

    • Ich muss den Brief noch machen. (very bad German, but people will get what you mean)

    As a general rule: It's better to speak bad German, than to stop speaking, just because you don't know how to say it well. Keep going, and learn from your mistakes.

    Fake it, till you make it :)

  • 1670052469
    0.000Sports100511 +3 lessons +21 lexemes0/3 •••
    Tennis · aktivität · bällen · exercise · exercises · fußball · hobby · jump · jumps · kick · scored · spiele · spieler · sport · teams · teilnahmen
    16 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Perfect 2100512 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    akzeptiert · gedacht · geführt · gegründet · genannt · geprüft · geschafft · passiert · verlassen · verstanden
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Arts100513 +6 lessons +39 lexemes0/6 •••
    ausstellungen · galerie · gitarre · instrumente · kulturen · künsten · künstler · musical · musiker · opening · painting · studios · theater
    13 words

    Plastik

    Plastik is one of the few words that changes meaning, depending on which gender it is.

    • das Plastik (artificial material, normally from petroleum)
    • die Plastik (a word for "sculpture")
  • 1670052469
    0.000Passive Voice100521 +2 lessons +13 lexemes0/2 •••
    berücksichtigt · bewertet · geboren · genutzt · geschrieben · gestohlen · geändert · veröffentlicht · wardest · wird
    10 words

    Passive with werden

    In German, werden + perfect participle forms a passive:

    • Ich schreibe einen Brief. (I write a letter.)
    • Ein Brief wird geschrieben. (A letter is being written.)

    Note that the accusative object of an active sentence (einen Brief) becomes the (nominative) subject of the passive version (ein Brief).

    The passive is often used when the original subject is unknown or irrelevant:

    • Mein Handy wurde gestohlen! ("My phone was stolen!" — You don't know who did it.)
    • Mein Handy wurde repariert. ("My phone was fixed." — You don't care by whom.)

    Werden has three different functions

    Using werden can be confusing for learners. However, there are clear distinctions between its three main uses:

    Werden + adjective/noun = "to become"

    If werden is used in combination with an adjective or noun, the meaning will be "to become" or "to get":

    • Sie wird Mutter. (She's becoming a mother.)
    • Ich werde müde. (I'm getting tired.)

    The German word bekommen is a confusing false friend to "become":

    • Sie bekommt eine Tochter. (She's getting a daughter.)

    Werden + Infinitiv = Futur

    Refer to the lesson "Future 2" for details.

    Werden + past participle = passive

    If used in combination with a participle, werden creates one type of passive:

    • Der Taxifahrer fährt den Fahrgast. (The taxi driver drives the passenger.)
    • Der Fahrgast wird gefahren. (The passenger is being driven.)
  • 1670052469
    0.000Religion100522 +4 lessons +24 lexemes0/4 •••
    Atheist · Christ · Islam · Priester · beten · glauben · götter · heilig · religionen · tod
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Politics 1100531 +6 lessons +39 lexemes0/6 •••
    Friede · Politiker · erfolg · interesse · mächte · partei · politik · präsidenten · stimme · verträge
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Adverbs 4100534 +3 lessons +15 lexemes0/3 •••
    dennoch · deswegen · ebenfalls · hierzu · hingegen · hinzu · jederzeit · mittlerweile · schließlich · soeben
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Abstract Objects 3100542 +7 lessons +49 lexemes0/7 •••
    anlage · anwendung · beispiels · förderungen · inhalt · kriterien · rubriken · systeme · vergleiche · verluste
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Conditional 2100544 +10 lessons +65 lexemes0/10 •••
    abgeben · erklären · kosten · sammeln · schicken · sparen · springen · vergleichen · verwenden · wandern
    10 words

    Conditional mood

    Please refer to lesson "Verbs: Conditional 1" to review to German's "Konjunktiv II" mood. This is normally formed by a form of würden + infinitive:

    • Wenn ich reich wäre, würde ich den ganzen Tag Deutsch lernen. (If I were rich, I would learn German all day.)

    Konjunktiv I

    German has another, lesser used form, the "Konjunktiv I". It is mostly used for marking indirect speech in newspapers:

    • Sänger: "Der Song ist gut!" (direct speech)
    • Der Sänger sagte, der Song sei gut. (indirect speech)

    Therefore, only the third person (singular and plural) is commonly used.

    Here are the forms of present tense and past tense (Präteritum), together with the two forms of Konjunktiv, to demonstrate the pattern. Forms in brackets are rarely used:

    person present Konj I
    ich habe (habe)
    du hast (habest)
    er/sie/es hat habe
    wir haben (haben)
    ihr habt (habet)
    sie/Sie haben (haben)
    person Präteritum Konj II
    ich hatte hätte
    du hattest hättest
    er/sie/es hatte hätte
    wir hatten hätten
    ihr hattet hättet
    sie/Sie hatten hätten

    As you can see, Konjunktiv I is sometimes the same as the present tense form. In these cases, German uses the Konjunktiv II form:

    • Männer: "Wir haben Hunde!" (direct speech)
    • Die Männer sagten, sie hätten Hunde. (indirect speech; uses hätten instead of haben)

    Here are some commonly used forms:

    • sein (to be) — er sei
    • haben (have) — er habe
    • müssen (must) — er müsse
    • können (can) — er könne
    • wollen (want) — er wolle
  • 1670052469
    0.000Philosophy100551 +2 lessons +7 lexemes0/2 •••
    Bewusstsein · Wirklichkeit · optimist · pessimist · philosophien · skeptisch · wahr
    7 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Verbs: Present 4100552 +6 lessons +46 lexemes0/6 •••
    beachtet · empfehlt · entstehe · existiere · fordre · führst · schafft · verlasse · versuchst · wirkt
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Fantasy & Science Fiction100553 +3 lessons +19 lexemes0/3 •••
    Dimension · Drache · Galaxie · Hexe · Magie · Planet · entdeckst · magisch · retten · verwandeln
    10 words

    Der/Die Außerirdische: adjectival nouns

    Some adjectives can turn into nouns in German. If they do so, they still change endings like any normal adjective:

    • deutsch (German) — der Deutsche
    • gefangen (captive) — der Gefangene
    • alt (old) — der Alte
    • außerirdisch (extraterrestrial) — der Außerirdische
    • verwandt (related) — der Verwandte

    • der deutsche Mann — der Deutsche

    • ein deutscher Mann — ein Deutscher
    • Ich kenne einen deutschen Mann — Ich kenne einen Deutschen.
    • eine deutsche Frau — eine Deutsche
    • der Hund der deutschen Frau — der Hund der Deutschen

    … and so on.

    Google "german adjectival nouns" for more information.

    If you want, now would be a good time to review the adjective endings in earlier lessons :)

    N-declension

    Don't confuse adjectival nouns with nouns that follow the "n-declension". (See lesson "Dat. Case" for details)

    For example, all other nouns for nationalities that end in -e follow the n-declension:

    • der Brite, der Chinese, der Ire, …
  • 1670052469
    0.000Abstract Objects 4100561 +10 lessons +65 lexemes0/10 •••
    Herkunft · anschlusses · berechnung · figuren · option · ordnungen · prinzipien · serien · sitze · töne
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Relative Pronouns100562 +4 lessons +18 lexemes0/4 •••
    billiger · das · dem · den · denen · der · deren · dessen · die · geholfen
    10 words

    Relative clauses

    In English, relative clauses look like this:

    • The girl who came to visit him was his aunt.
    • The man, whose daughter worked as a manager, came home.

    In German, relative clauses are subordinate clauses. The verb moves from position 2 to the end.

    • Der Mann kauft Hundefutter. Ihm gehört der Hund. (The man buys dog food. The dog belongs to him.)
    • Der Mann, dem der Hund gehört, kauft Hundefutter. (The man to whom the dog belongs buys dog food.)

    Relative clauses are always set off by commas from the rest of the sentence.

    (There's no distinction between restrictive and non-restrictive clauses.)

    Relative pronouns

    The relative pronouns look like the definite articles, with the exception of the dative plural and the genitive forms.

    The relative pronouns closely correspond to the personal pronouns they replace:

    • Das ist der Mann. Er hat einen Hund.
    • Das ist der Mann, der einen Hund hat.

    • Das sind die Bälle. Mit ihnen spielt er. (These are the balls. He plays with them.)

    • Das sind die Bälle, mit denen er spielt.
    pers. pronoun rel. pronoun grammar
    er der masc. (nom.)
    es das neut. (nom.+acc.)
    sie die fem./pl. (nom.+acc.)
    ihn den masc. (acc.)
    ihm dem masc.+neut. (dat.)
    ihr der fem. (dat.)
    ihnen denen pl. (dat.)

    Relative pronouns can never be dropped.

    Genitive relative clauses

    The genitive version derives from the possessive pronoun:

    • Die Frau ist krank. Ihr Sohn hat einen Hund.
    • Die Frau, deren Sohn einen Hund hat, ist krank.

    • Der Mann mag Pizza. Seine Tochter kann singen. (The man likes pizza. His daughter can sing.)

    • Der Mann, dessen Tochter singen kann, mag Pizza.

    Here, too, the possessive pronouns correspond somewhat to the relative pronouns:

    poss. pronoun rel. pronoun grammar
    sein(*) dessen masc./neut.
    ihr(*) deren fem./pl.

    The relative clause determines which pronoun to use

    Be aware that the relevant case is in the relative clause, not the main clause:

    • Der Hund schläft. (Hund = nominative)
    • Ich mag den Hund. (Hund = accusative)
    • Der Hund, den ich mag, schläft. (use accusative relative pronoun)

    The form you need to use is governed by the grammatical gender and number of the word that is being referred to (outside the relative clause), and the case is governed by the context of the relative clause.

    Keep in mind that certain prepositions and verbs always trigger a certain case, e.g. the preposition mit always takes the dative case and so does the verb helfen.

    • Das Kind schläft. Die Frau hat ihm geholfen. (The kid sleeps. The woman helped him.)
    • Das Kind, dem die Frau geholfen hat, schläft.
  • 1670052469
    0.000Classical Music100563 +3 lessons +13 lexemes0/3 •••
    Dirigent · Flöte · Geige · Klavier · Komponist · Melodie · Orchester · Sänger · Trommel · dirigieren
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Politics 2100570 +3 lessons +18 lexemes0/3 •••
    Bundesrepublik · Polizei · bundesregierungen · freiheiten · reiche · strategie · umfrage · urteil · veranstaltungen · ämter
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000German Culture100581 +2 lessons +10 lexemes0/2 •••
    Berlin · Brezel · Fest · Kiosk · Oktober+fest · Pils · Sauerkraut · Wurst · feiern · tag der deutschen einheit
    10 words

    What is a Wurst?

    A Wurst is a sausage. It does not specifically refer to any kind of sausage. It could be a salami, chorizo, mortadella, frankfurter, etc.

    Bratwurst specifically refers to a fried or grilled sausage.

  • 1670052469
    0.000The World100582 +3 lessons +17 lexemes0/3 •••
    Asien · Australien · China · Indien · Kontinent · Nord+amerika · Pyramide · Südamerika · Union · europäisch
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Idioms and Proverbs10010001 +2 lessons +15 lexemes0/2 ••• Learn Test out
    Meister · alles · das · du · es · ich · in · nicht · sagt · wir
    10 words
  • 1670052469
    0.000Flirting10010002 +2 lessons +15 lexemes0/2 ••• Learn Test out
    bist · darf · deine · dich · möchte · nicht · nächste · süß · will · wir
    10 words
0.034

Podstawy 1 updated 2020-11-18

Zaimki osobowe (Personal Pronouns)

Liczba pojedyncza

Polski Angielski uwagi
ja I
ty you l. pojedyncza
on he
ona she
ono, to it

Liczba mnoga

Polski Angielski uwagi
my we
wy you l. mnoga
oni they r. męski
one they r. żeński
one, te they r. nijaki

Zaimek you oznacza 2-gą osobę zarówno liczby pojedynczej ty, jak i mnogiej wy. Dawny zaimek osobowy w 2-giej osobie liczby pojedynczej (thou - ty) zanikł w języku angielskim i jego funkcję przejął zaimek liczby mnogiej, dlatego z "you" używa się form czasownika właściwych dla liczby mnogiej.

  • You are going there - Ty tam idziesz - lub - Wy tam idziecie (zależnie od kontekstu zdania)

Zaimki liczby pojedynczej "he", "she" i "it" mają jedną wspólną formę w liczbie mnogiej: "they". Zaimek "they" nie sprawa problemu tam, gdzie odpowiada polskim zaimkom "oni" czy "one", ale trzeba też pamiętać, że tak samo ma zastosowanie w przypadku zwierząt, przedmiotów i innych rzeczowników nieosobowych - wszystkie one po angielsku są rodzaju nijakiego - tam, gdzie po polsku musimy użyć zaimków "to", "te" lub "one":

  • They are my sisters - One są moimi siostrami
  • They are my brothers - Oni są moimi braćmi
  • They are my children - To są moje dzieci (Te dzieci są moje)
  • They are my apples - To są moje jabłka (Te jabłka są moje)

Czas teraźniejszy prosty (Present Simple) - cz.1

Czas Present Simple używany jest do mówienia o czynnościach rutynowych, powtarzających się, oraz do mówienia o cechach i stanach. Tworzy się go używając podmiotu (zaimka lub rzeczownika) i podstawowej formy czasownika, z wyjątkiem 3. osoby liczby pojedynczej, gdzie do podst. formy czasownika dodawana jest końcówka -s lub -es.

Czasownik to be (być) ma odmianę nieregularną:

  • I am - ja jestem
  • you are - ty jesteś
  • he/she/it is - on/ona/ono jest
  • we are - my jesteśmy
  • you are - wy jesteście
  • they are - oni/one są

Odmiana czasownika to eat (jeść):

  • I eat - ja jem
  • you eat - ty jesz
  • he/she/it eats - on/ona/ono je
  • we eat - my jemy
  • you eat - wy jecie
  • they eat - oni/one jedzą

Odmiana czasownika to drink (pić):

  • I drink - ja piję
  • you drink - ty pijesz
  • he/she/it drinks - on/ona/ono pije
  • we drink - my pijemy
  • you drink - wy pijecie
  • they drink - oni/one piją

Rzeczowniki policzalne i niepoliczalne

Rzeczowniki policzalne: takie, które są postrzegane jako indywidualne jednostki, dające się policzyć, np. człowiek man, jabłko apple, kot cat, dzień day.

Rzeczowniki niepoliczalne: postrzegane jako jedna całość, dla której nie da się zastosować rozróżnienia na liczbę pojedynczą i mnogą, nie da się policzyć, a można co najwyżej zmierzyć, np. mleko milk, woda water, miłość love. W j. angielskim niepoliczalny także chleb bread i wiele innych pokarmów.


Przedimki (Articles)

W j. angielskim ten sam wyraz może występować w różnych funkcjach (np. rzeczownik, przymiotnik, czasownik). O funkcji słowa często informuje przedimek: przedimek stawiany jest tylko przed rzeczownikami (ale nie przed wszystkimi). Są trzy rodzaje przedimków.

Przedimek nieokreślony (indefinite article): a lub an

Przedimek nieokreślony występuje przed rzeczownikiem policzalnym w liczbie pojedynczej, oznacza jego jeden egzemplarz. Używa się go z rzeczownikami wymienionymi po raz pierwszy, gdy nie ma się na myśli konkretnego przedmiotu czy osoby, lub gdy traktuje się daną osobę lub przedmiot jako reprezentanta grupy, lub dowolny egzemplarz z tej grupy. Przy tłumaczeniu z j. angielskiego zwykle należy go pominąć.

Przedimek nieokreślony a jest używany przed rzeczownikami zaczynającymi się od spółgłoski, a przedimek an przed rzeczownikami zaczynającymi się od samogłoski - stawiając przedimek patrzymy na pierwszy dźwięk wyrazu, a nie na pierwszą literę.

  • a man – mężczyzna
  • a university – uniwersytet (wymowa zaczyna się od spółgłoski)
  • an apple – jabłko
  • an hour – godzina (wymowa zaczyna się od samogłoski)

Przykłady użycia w zdaniu:

  • I have a dog - Mam psa (jednego, nieokreślonego psa, pewnego przedstawiciela gatunku psów)
  • It is a cat - To jest kot

Przedimek określony (definite article): the

Używa się go z rzeczownikami w liczbie pojedynczej i mnogiej, zarówno policzalnymi i niepoliczalnymi. Zawsze oznacza on jakiś konkretny obiekt. Używa się go, gdy wiadomo a jakim dokładnie obiekcie mówimy. Czasem pomijamy w tłumaczeniu, czasem tłumaczony jako "ten", "ta", "to".

  • I see a dog. The dog is black. – Widzę psa. (Ten) pies jest czarny.

Przedimek zerowy

Czyli brak przedimka. Taka sytuacja występuje z rzeczownikami niepoliczalnymi w liczbie pojedynczej i rzeczownikami w liczbie mnogiej, gdy nie mówimy o konkretnych obiektach. Ponadto w liczbie pojedynczej z rzeczownikami abstrakcyjnymi i przy wypowiedziach ogólnych, nie dotyczących konkretnego obiektu.

  • I like women – Lubię kobiety (ogólnie kobiety, a nie jakieś konkretne)
  • This is water – To jest woda (woda jest niepoliczalna, stąd brak przedimka "a", nie chodzi też o konkretny rodzaj wody, stąd brak przedimka "the")
  • Sugar is white – Cukier jest biały (cukier jest niepoliczalny i jest to wypowiedź ogólna)

Podstawy 2 updated 2021-02-13

Liczba mnoga rzeczowników

Regularna liczba mnoga

Najczęściej liczbę mnogą rzeczowników tworzy się przez dodanie końcówki -s do rzeczownika w liczbie pojedynczej.

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
an apple apples jabłko / jabłka
a car cars samochód / samochody

Jeśli rzeczownik kończy się literą o, rówinież dodajemy końcówkę -es, choć od tej reguły są już wyjątki(+).

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a potato potatoes ziemniak / ziemniaki
a tomato tomatoes pomidor / pomidory

Rzeczowniki kończące się literami f albo fe otrzymują końcówkę -ves. Od tej regły również są wyjątki(+).

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a wife wives żona / żony
a life lives życie / życia

Rzeczowniki kończące się na literę y poprzedzoną spółgłoską otrzymują końcówkę -ies.

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a lady ladies pani / panie
a city cities miasto / miasta

Jeśli jednak litera y jest poprzedzona samogloską, dodajemy tylko -s.

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a day days dzień / dni
a boy boys chłopiec / chłopcy

Nieregularna liczba mnoga

Niektóre rzeczowniki w liczbie mnogiej zmieniają swoje brzmienie. Zwykle są to słowa staroangielskie, które zachowały swoją formę liczby mnogiej.

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a man men mężczyzna / mężczyźni
a woman women kobieta / kobiety
a child children dziecko / dzieci

Rzeczowniki zbiorowe

Istnieją w języku angielskim rzeczowniki które mimo formy liczby pojedynczej uważane są za rzeczowniki w liczbie mnogiej. Niektóre z nich mają dodatkowo formę liczby mnogiej, ale zyskują wówczas inne znaczenie, np. peoples - ludy, narody; folks - ludziska, ludzie, znajomi.

Część z tych rzeczowników łączy się z czasownikami tylko w liczbie mnogiej, np. to be w formie are (są), a nie is (jest):

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
- people ludzie
- police policja
  • People are good. - Ludzie są dobrzy.
  • Police are on the site. - Policja jest na miejscu.

Natomiast w wypadku niektórych rzeczowników mających tylko formę liczby mnogiej można użyć słów "piece", "bit", "item", "article" dla zaznaczenia, że chodzi o jedną sztukę:

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a piece of information information informacja, informacje
a bit of news news wiadomość, wiadomości

Inne z nich, mogą być traktowane jako rzeczownik w liczbie pojedynczej: a family, a team. W zdaniach przybierać mogą zarówno formę liczby pojedynczej, jak i mnogiej. Liczba pojedyncza oznacza identyczne zachowanie zbiorowości, a mnoga - indywidualne zachowanie się jej członków.

l.poj. l.mn. po polsku
a family family rodzina
a crew crew załoga
  • The family is delighted. - Rodzina jest zachwycona.
  • The family are talking at the table. - Rodzina rozmawia przy stole.

Liczba mnoga updated 2020-01-18

Liczba mnoga rzeczowników

Ogólne zasady tworzenia liczby mnogiej rzeczowników zostały szczegółowo omówiona we wstępie do działu Podstawy 2. Poniżej omówiono tylko niektóre rzeczowniki, z uwzględnieniem trudniejszych przypadków.

Większość rzeczowników rozpatrywanych w tym dziale posiada regularną liczbę mnogą, tj. tworzoną się przez dodanie końcówki -s lub -es do rzeczownika w liczbie pojedynczej.

L. poj. L. mn. Polski
an animal animals zwierzę / zwierzęta
an apple apples jabłko / jabłka
a bird birds ptak / ptaki
a book books książka / ksiązki
a cat cats kot / koty
a dog dogs pies / psy
a duck ducks kaczka / kaczki
an elephant elephants słoń / słonie
a horse horses koń / konie
a newspaper newspapers gazeta / gazety
a plate plates talerz / talerze; tablica / tablice
a sandwich sandwiches kanapka / kanapki
a turtle turtles żółw / żółwie

Wyjątkiem jest rzeczownik fruit, który ma dwie formy liczby mnogiej: fruit - identycznie jak w liczbie pojedynczej (jeśli chodzi o więcej takich samych owoców), lub fruits (jeśli chodzi o różne owoce). Podstawowa jest forma fruit i jest to powodem częstych błędów.

W innych działach pojawiają się rzeczowniki, które mają mniej intuicyjną liczbę mnogą, np.:

L. poj. L. mn. Polski
a dress dresses sukienka / sukienki
a tomato tomatoes pomidor / pomidory
a fish fish ryba / ryby tego samego gatunku
a fish fishes ryba / ryby różnych gatunków
a child children dziecko /dzieci
a man men mężczyzna / mężczyźni
a woman women kobieta / kobiety

Liczba mnoga zaimków

L. poj. - Polski L. poj. - Angielski L. mn. - Polski L. mn. - Angielski
ja I my we
ty you wy you
on he oni they
ona she one they
ono, to it one, te they

Jak widać powyżej, zaimki he, she i it (l.poj.) mają jedną wspólną formę w liczbie mnogiej: they.

W języku polskim zaimka "to" można użyć zarówno do pojedynczego przedmiotu, jak i mnogich przedmiotów. W języku angielskim jest to wykluczone: jeśli wiemy, że czegoś jest większa ilość, musimy użyć zaimka w liczbie mnogiej - np. they / these / those.

Zaimka "they" użyjemy do prostego potwierdzenia czy zaprzeczenia. Natomiast jeśli coś jest wskazywane (wskazywane dosłownie, np. palcem - albo wskazywane przez kontekst zdania) - użyjemy raczej zaimków this (ten) lub that (tamten), a w liczbie mnogiej these (te) lub those (tamte):

  • Are they your books? Yes, they are. - [Czy to są twoje książki? Tak, moje.]
  • Are these your books? These are mine, but those are not. - [Czy to są twoje książki? Te są moje, a tamte nie.]

Użycie czasownika z rzeczownikami w liczbie mnogiej

Przy wszystkich osobach liczby mnogiej czasownik zachowuje swoją podstawowa formę:

  • We eat apples. - Jemy jabłka
  • You eat apples - Jecie jabłka (też: Jesz jabłka)
  • They eat sandwiches. - Oni jedzą kanapki.

  • We have plates. - My mamy talerze.

  • You have dogs. - Wy macie psy.
  • They have horses. - Oni maja konie.

  • Girls eat sandwiches. - Dziewczęta jedzą kanapki.

  • The turtles eat rice. - Żółwie jedzą ryż.
  • They read the books. - Oni czytają książki.

Uwaga! Często popełnianym błędem jest przypuszczenie, że jeśli podmiot jest w liczbie mnogiej (we, they, itp.) - to czasownik uzyskuje końcówkę -s - jest to nieprawda. Czasownik z końcówką -s stosuje się wyłącznie w 3-ciej osobie liczby pojedynczej. Innymi słowy, odrębna forma czasownika ma związek z liczbą pojedynczą podmiotu w 3-ciej osobie (on, ona, ono itp):

  • She (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj.) reads the newspaper. - Ona czyta tę gazetę.
  • She (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj.) reads the newspapers. - Ona czyta te gazety.
  • They (podmiot w 3 os. l.mn.) read the newspapers. - One czytają te gazety.

  • He (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj) has a dog. - On ma psa.

  • He (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj) has dogs. - On ma psy.
  • They (podmiot w 3 os. l.mn) have dogs. - Oni mają psy.

Innymi słowy: końcówka liczby mnogiej -s dotyczy tylko rzeczowników.

Liczba mnoga updated 2018-10-25

Liczba mnoga rzeczowników

Ogólne zasady tworzeni liczby mnogiej rzeczowników zostały szczegółowo omówiona we wstępie do działu Podstawy 2. Poniżej omówiono tylko niektóre rzeczowniki, z uwzględnieniem trudniejszych przypadków.

Większość rzeczowników rozpatrywanych w tym dziale posiada regularną liczbę mnogą, tj. tworzoną się przez dodanie końcówki -s lub -es do rzeczownika w liczbie pojedynczej.

L. poj. L. mn. Polski
an animal animals zwierzę / zwierzęta
an apple apples jabłko / jabłka
a bird birds ptak / ptaki
a book books książka / ksiązki
a cat cats kot / koty
a dog dogs pies / psy
a duck ducks kaczka / kaczki
an elephant elephants słoń / słonie
a horse horses koń / konie
a newspaper newspapers gazeta / gazety
a plate plates talerz / talerze; tablica / tablice
a sandwich sandwiches kanapka / kanapki
a turtle turtles żółw / żółwie

Wyjątkiem jest rzeczownik fruit, który ma dwie formy liczby mnogiej: fruit - identycznie jak w liczbie pojedynczej (jeśli chodzi o więcej takich samych owoców), lub fruits (jeśli chodzi o różne owoce). Podstawowa jest forma fruit i jest to powodem częstych błędów.

W innych działach pojawiają się rzeczowniki, które mają mniej intuicyjną liczbę mnogą, np.:

L. poj. L. mn. Polski
a dress dresses sukienka / sukienki
a tomato tomatoes pomidor / pomidory
a fish fish ryba / ryby tego samego gatunku
a fish fishes ryba / ryby różnych gatunków
a child children dziecko /dzieci
a man men mężczyzna / mężczyźni
a woman women kobieta / kobiety

Liczba mnoga zaimków

L. poj. - Polski L. poj. - Angielski L. mn. - Polski L. mn. - Angielski
ja I my we
ty you wy you
on he oni they
ona she one they
ono, to it one, te they

Jak widać powyżej, zaimki he, she i it (l.poj.) mają jedną wspólną formę w liczbie mnogiej: they.

W języku polskim zaimka "to" można użyć zarówno do pojedynczego przedmiotu, jak i mnogich przedmiotów. W języku angielskim jest to wykluczone: jeśli wiemy, że czegoś jest większa ilość, musimy użyć zaimka w liczbie mnogiej - np. they / these / those.

Zaimka "they" użyjemy do prostego potwierdzenia czy zaprzeczenia. Natomiast jeśli coś jest wskazywane (wskazywane dosłownie, np. palcem - albo wskazywane przez kontekst zdania) - użyjemy raczej zaimków this (ten) lub that (tamten), a w liczbie mnogiej these (te) lub those (tamte):

  • Are they your books? Yes, they are. - [Czy to są twoje książki? Tak, moje.]
  • Are these your books? These are mine, but those are not. - [Czy to są twoje książki? Te są moje, a tamte nie.]

Użycie czasownika z rzeczownikami w liczbie mnogiej

Przy wszystkich osobach liczby mnogiej czasownik zachowuje swoją podstawowa formę:

  • We eat apples. - Jemy jabłka
  • You eat apples - Jecie jabłka (też: Jesz jabłka)
  • They eat sandwiches. - Oni jedzą kanapki.

  • We have plates. - My mamy talerze.

  • You have dogs. - Wy macie psy.
  • They have horses. - Oni maja konie.

  • Girls eat sandwiches. - Dziewczęta jedzą kanapki.

  • The turtles eat rice. - Żółwie jedzą ryż.
  • They read the books. - Oni czytają książki.

Uwaga! Często popełnianym błędem jest przypuszczenie, że jeśli podmiot jest w liczbie mnogiej (we, they, itp.) - to czasownik uzyskuje końcówkę -s - jest to nieprawda. Czasownik z końcówką -s stosuje się wyłącznie w 3-ciej osobie liczby pojedynczej. Innymi słowy, odrębna forma czasownika ma związek z liczbą pojedynczą podmiotu w 3-ciej osobie (on, ona, ono itp):

  • She (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj.) reads the newspaper. - Ona czyta tę gazetę.
  • She (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj.) reads the newspapers. - Ona czyta te gazety.
  • They (podmiot w 3 os. l.mn.) read the newspapers. - One czytają te gazety.

  • He (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj) has a dog. - On ma psa.

  • He (podmiot w 3 os. l.poj) has dogs. - On ma psy.
  • They (podmiot w 3 os. l.mn) have dogs. - Oni mają psy.

Innymi słowy: końcówka liczby mnogiej -s dotyczy tylko rzeczowników.

Zaimki dzierżawcze updated 2020-06-29

Określanie własności i przynależności

W języku polskim do określania własności (czy przynależności) jakiejś rzeczy używamy zaimków osobowych (mój, twój itp.):

  • To jest moja książka. Ta książka jest moja.
  • To twój pies. Ten pies jest twój.

Albo rzeczowników w dopełniaczu:

  • To jest książka dziewczynki.

W j. angielskim istnieją 4 sposoby określania własności lub przynależności: przymiotniki dzierżawcze, zaimki dzierżawcze, dopełniacz saksoński i dopełniacz z "of".

Przymiotniki dzierżawcze

Angielski Polski
my mój, moja, moje, moi
your twój, twoja, twoje, twoi
his jego
her jej
its tego, jego, jej; onego, onej; swoje
our nasz, nasza, nasze, nasi
your wasz, wasza, wasze, wasi
their ich

Przymiotniki dzierżawcze występują bezpośrednio przed rzeczownikiem i zawsze występują razem z rzeczownikiem. Przymiotniki te zastępują ponadto przedimki "a/an" i "the" - w wypadku zastosowania przymiotnika dzierżawczego, przedimek jest już zbędny.

  • This is my book. - To jest moja książka.
  • That is your dog. - To jest twój pies.
  • She is our child. - Ona jest naszym dzieckiem.

Zaimek (i identyczny przymiotnik dzierżawczy) its sprawia sporo kłopotów w nauce, bo jego dokładnego odpowiednika nie używa się obecnie w języku polskim (dawniej używało się słowa "onego"). Oznacza on przynależność czegoś do innego rzeczownika nieożywionego albo do zwierzęcia (gramatyka j.angielskiego traktuje zwierzęta jak rzeczy: kot nie pije "jego mleka", tylko "onego mleko" - a poprawniej we współczesnej polszczyźnie - "swoje mleko"). Zatem its jest stosowany by przypisać cień do drzewa, mleko do kota, krajobrazy czy bogactwa naturalne do jakiejś krainy. (Dla porządku należy dodać, że właściciele zwierząt domowych często traktują je trochę jak ludzi, stosując wobec nich zaimki "he", "she", "his", "her" - jednak w tym temacie nie jest to dopuszczane.)

  • A tree has its shadow. - Drzewo ma swój cień.
  • The cat drinks its milk. - Kot pije swoje mleko.
  • Scotland is famous for its castles. - Szkocja jest znana ze swoich zamków.

Zaimki dzierżawcze

Angielski Polski
mine mój, moja, moje, moi
yours twój, twoja, twoje, twoi
his jego
hers jej
its tego, jego, jej, swoje
ours nasz, nasza, nasze, nasi
yours wasz, wasza, wasze, wasi
theirs ich

Zaimki dzierżawcze mogą pełnić samodzielną funkcję w zdaniu i zastępują rzeczownik (w funkcji dopełnienia). Często występują na końcu zdania. Część z nich ma formę identyczną z odpowiadającym im przymiotnikami dzierżawczymi - co bywa powodem nieporozumień.

  • This book is mine. - Ta książka jest moja.
  • That dog is yours. - Ten pies jest twój.
  • The blue shirt is his and the pink one is hers. - Niebieska koszula jest jego, a różowa jej.

Dopełniacz z "of"

Dopełniacza z "of" używa się najczęściej do oznaczenia przynależności do rzeczy nieożywionych, do części rzeczy, opisywania pojęć abstrakcyjnych i do oznaczania przynależności do osób opisanych dłuższą frazą.

  • The colour of the hat - Kolor kapelusza
  • The end of the book - Koniec książki
  • Fruit of the Loom (marka odzieży) - Owoc krosna

Dopełniacz saksoński 's

Dopełniacz saksoński formowany jest przez końcówkę -'s (apostrof+litera s), dodawaną na końcu rzeczownika w liczbie pojedynczej lub mnogiej w wypadku jeśli wyraz w tej formie nie kończy się literą "s". Jeśli wyraz w liczbie mnogiej kończy się literą "s", po niej dodawany jest sam apostrof -' (przykłady niżej). Jeśli w liczbie pojedynczej rzeczownik kończy się literą "s" lub "x" - poprawne są obie formy: -'s i -'.

W j.angielskim jest inna kolejność słów niż w polskim - najpierw informacja o właścicielu, potem o posiadanej rzeczy. Ponadto w języku angielskim dopełniacz saksoński zaznacza się tylko na końcu całego wyrażenia opisującego rzeczownik (np. "the tall boy's ball") - gdy w polskim dopełniacz zmienia końcówkę każdego wyrazu w wyrażeniu (np. "piłka wysokiego chłopca") -

Dopełniacza saksońskiego używa się najczęściej w wypadku przynależności do ludzi i istot żywych. Zakres użycia dopełniacza różni się jednak znacząco od zastosowania dopełniacza w języku polskim.

Dopełniacz saksoński przy liczbie pojedynczej
  • The girl's cat - Kot dziewczynki
  • The children's cats - Koty dzieci
  • This is a girl's book. - To jest książka (jakiejś) dziewczynki.
  • McDonald's Restaurant - Restauracja McDonalda
  • The tall boy's ball - Piłka wysokiego chłopca
  • The Max's toy - lub - The Max' toy - Zabawka Maksa
Dopełniacz saksoński przy liczbie mnogiej
  • The two girls' cat - Kot dwu dziewczynek
  • These boys' dog - Pies tych chłopców
  • Their two cats' food is milk. - Mleko jest jedzeniem ich dwóch kotów.

c.d.n.

Zaimki w bierniku updated 2020-09-16

Przypadki w języku angielskim

W języku angielskim obecnie występują tylko 3 przypadki gramatyczne.

  • Nominative case (Nom. - mianownik, współcześnie nazywany częściej Subjective case) - stosowany wszędzie tam, gdzie zaimek lub rzeczownik jest podmiotem w zdaniu.
  • Accusative case (Acc. - biernik, współcześnie nazywany częściej Objective case lub Oblique case) - stosowany gdy zaimek lub rzeczownik występuje w zdaniu w funkcji dopełnienia bliższego.
  • Genitive case (Gen. - dopełniacz, współcześnie nazywany częściej Possessive case) - stosowany do opisywania własności i przynależności obiektów.

Obecnie 3 powyższe przypadki zachowały się w formach zaimków osobowych, ponadto w zaimku who (kto) i jego formach w bierniku whom (kogo) i dopełniaczu whose (czyje).

W wypadku rzeczowników przypadki Subjective case i Objective case są już nierozróżnialne i określa się je mianem Common case. Rzeczowniki ujawniają zatem tylko 2 przypadki gramatyczne:

  • Common case ("przypadek wspólny" lub "zwykły")
  • Genitive case (dopełniacz)

Zaimki w bierniku

Angielski Polski
me mi; mnie ; mną
you ci, tobie; ciebie, cię ; tobą
him mu, jemu ; go, jego ; nim
her jej, niej ; ją, nią ; niej
it to ; temu, jemu, tej, jej ; tym (w przyp. rzeczowników nieosobowych)
us nam ; nas ; nami
you wam ; was ; wami
them im ; je, ich, nich ; nimi

Dopełnienie bliższe i dalsze

Zastosowanie przypadków w języku angielskim różni się znacząco od ich zastosowania w języku polskim. W angielskim podmiot (Subject) jest w mianowniku, dopełnienia bliższe i dalsze (Direct & Indirect Object) najczęściej w bierniku. Różnica rzuca się w oczy w zdaniach typu:

  • To jest on - This (Subject) is him (Direct Object)

Dopełnienie bliższe (D.Obj.) jest poddawany działaniu czasownika. O dopełnienie bliższe spytamy "what?" lub "whom"

  • To jest książka - This (Subj.) is a book (D.Obj.) - What is this?
  • Mam ją! - I have her - Whom do you have?

Dopełnienie dalsze (Ind.Obj.) jest odbiorcą działania wykonywanego na dopełnieniu bliższym. O dopełnienie dalsze spytamy np. "to what?", "to whom?", "for what?", "for whom?". W zdaniu dopełnienie dalsze najczęściej jest przed bliższym. W przeciwnym przypadku - przed dopełnieniem dalszym należy dostawić przyimek, np. to, for czy of.

  • Mama czyta mi książkę - Mom reads me (Ind.Obj.) a book (D.Obj.). ; Mom reads a book (D.Obj) to me (Ind.Obj.). - To whom mom reads a book?
Przykłady zaimków w bierniku:
  • No, not me. (Acc.) - Nie, nie mnie. lub Nie, to nie ja (np. coś zrobiłem)
  • Is it her? (Acc.) - Czy to jest ona?
  • He has us (Acc.) - On nas ma (Złapał nas.)
  • We have her (Acc.) - Mamy ją
  • I read them - Czytam je. (np. gazety)
  • Not him (Acc.) - Nie on. lub Nie jemu
  • He reads us a book (Acc.) - On czyta nam książkę

# Własność i przynależność - c.d. Pierwsza część.

Jak wspomniano, dopełniacz służy do określania własności:

  • No, it's not mine (Gen.) - Nie, nie jest mój/moja/moje
  • Mom reads my book (Gen.) - Mama czyta moją książkę
  • Is it hers? (Gen.) - Czy to jest jej? Czy to należy do niej?
  • We have hers (Gen.) - Mamy jej (rzecz, o której była już mowa)
Użycie dopełniacza saksońskiego bez określanego nim rzeczownika

Są przypadki, gdy rzeczownik do którego przynależność się określa nie jest niezbędny. Dzieje się tak, gdy np. można go się łatwo domyśleć:

  • We need a car. We can use my mother's. - Potrzebujemy samochodu. Możemy użyć (samochodu) mojej mamy.
  • I am staying at John's - Zatrzymałem się u (tj. w domu) Johna.
  • I have an appointment at the dentist's. - Mam wizytę u (tj. w gabinecie) dentysty.
  • We went to McDonald’s. - Poszliśmy do (restauracji) McDonalda.

Użycie podwójnego wyrażenia dzierżawczego (Double Possessive)

W niektórych przypadkach łączy się dopełniacz z „of” z dopełniaczem saksońskim lub zaimkiem dzierżawczym.

Dopełniacz z „of” + dopełniacz saksoński
  • A friend of my brother's - jeden z przyjaciół mojego brata
  • This is a car of my father’s. - To jest samochód mojego ojca.
Dopełniacz z „of” + zaimek dzierżawczy
  • A friend of yours - jeden z twoich przyjaciół
  • A friend of mine - jeden z moich przyjaciół

Różnice znaczeniowe przy zastosowaniu różnych typów dopełniacza

  • I am a friend of John's (podwójny dopełniacz) - Jestem przyjacielem Jana. (Jan uważa mnie za swojego przyjaciela)
  • I am a friend of John (dopełniacz z „of”) - Jestem przyjacielem Jana. (Ja sam uważam się za przyjaciela Jana)

  • A painting of Anna's (podwójny dopełniacz) - Obraz Anny (obraz należący do Anny)

  • A painting of Anna (dopełniacz z „of”) - Obraz Anny (obraz przedstawiający Annę)
  • An Anna's painting (dopełniacz saksoński) - Obraz Anny (obraz namalowany przez Annę)

Pytania updated 2020-11-19

Zadawanie pytań typu "Tak/Nie"

Pytanie typu "Tak/Nie", to takie, na które wystarczy odpowiedzieć "Tak" lub "Nie." Po polsku zaczynają się one pytajnikiem "Czy".

Zdanie oznajmujące

  • She is nice. - Ona jest miła.
  • She has a ball. - Ona ma piłkę.

Pytanie przez intonację

Najprostszą formą pytania jest wypowiedzenie zdania oznajmującego z pytającą intonacją, tzn. zawieszając w górze głos na ostatnim słowie:

  • She is nice? - Ona jest miła?
  • She has a ball? - Ona ma piłkę?

Nie jest to formalne zadawanie pytań, ale w mowie jest często stosowane.

Pytanie przez inwersję

Inwersja to zamiana miejscami orzeczenia (czasownika) i podmiotu zdania.

I. Jeśli czasownikiem głównym jest "to be" = "być" w formie osobowej, to po prostu zamieniamy tę formę miejscami z podmiotem.

  • She is nice. - Ona jest miła.
  • Is she nice? - Czy ona jest miła?

  • I am a student. - Jestem studentem.

  • Am I a student? - Czy jestem studentem?

  • We are well. - Mamy się dobrze.

  • Are we well? - Czy mamy się dobrze?

  • You are here. - Jesteście tutaj.

  • Are you here? - Czy jesteście tutaj?

II. Jeśli głównym czasownikiem nie jest "to be" (ani żaden czasownik modalny, jak "can"), to przy tworzeniu pytań używamy czasownika posiłkowego, czyli operatora "to do". Przypomnijmy, że czasownik posiłkowy (operator) przejmuje formę osobową czasownika głównego, a czasownik główny występuje wtedy w tzw. gołej formie bezokolicznika, tzn. na golasa, czyli bez partykuły to. W trzeciej osobie liczby pojedynczej musimy pamiętać, że:

| "Jak does przychodzi, -s w las odchodzi".|

Zdanie oznajmujące:

  • She has a ball. - Ona ma piłkę.

Zdanie wzmocnione przez czasownik posiłkowy:

  • She does have a ball. - Ona (rzeczywiście) ma piłkę.

Zdanie pytające z inwersją operatora i podmiotu:

  • Does she have a ball? - Czy ona ma piłkę?

Tak samo tworzymy inwersję z każdym innym zwykłym czasownikiem głównym. Zwykły czasownik znaczy tu nie posiłkowy i nie modalny (taki, jak "can"). Spróbujmy utworzyć pytania z czasownikiem to like = lubić.

  • Anna and Maria like Tom. ––> Do Anna and Maria like Tom?
  • We like Adam and Tom. ––> Do we like Adam and Tom?
  • Julia does not like Tom. ––> Does Julia not like Tom?

Pytania z przywieszką

Zamiast stosować inwersję w zdaniu głównym możemy doczepić do zdania oznajmującego przywieszkę z zaprzeczonym pytaniem, oddzieloną średnikiem. Tak, jak po polsku, gdy dodajemy Czyż nie?:

  • She is nice. - Ona jest miła.
  • She is nice; is she not? - Ona jest miła; czyż nie jest?

  • She has a ball. - Ona ma piłkę.

  • She has a ball; does she not? - Ona ma piłkę; czyż nie ma?

Jednak w przypadku zdania przeczącego, musimy przywiesić twierdzącą przywieszkę:

  • Julia does not like Tom. ––> Julia does not like Tom; does she?

Ze względu na kłopoty Duolingo z procesowaniem znaków przestankowych innych niż kropka, pytajnik i wykrzyknik, nie możemy na razie zamieścić w kursie żadnych pytań z przywieszką.

Spójniki updated 2018-10-25

Spójniki

Spójniki występują w zdaniach złożonych, aby połączyć dwa zdania, równoważniki zdania lub wyrażenia w spójną całość. Spójniki dzielą się na współrzędne i podrzędne, które odpowiednio łączą dwa zdania współrzędnę lub podrzędno-nadrzędne.

1. If – Jeśli, jeżeli, jak

If you want this apple, take it. – Jeśli/jeżeli/jak chcesz to jabłko, weź je.

Do it if you want. – Zrób to jeśli/jeżeli chcesz.

Po if nie używa się czasu przyszłego z użyciem will, jedynie struktury teraźniejsze i przeszłe. Znaczenia czasu przyszłego używa się za pomocą struktur, które mogą być użyte w odniesieniu do przyszłości, np. Present Continuous, Present Simple, czy be going to.

If you’re going there tomorrow, I’m going, too. – Jeśli/jeżeli/jak ty idziesz tam jutro, to ja też idę.

If tłumaczy sie również jako czy w zdaniach podrzędnych, o których mowa w następnych lekcjach. Takie samo znaczenie ma spójnik whether:

I don’t know if it’s true. – Nie wiem, czy to prawda.

Tell me the truth whether you want to or not. – Powiedz mi prawdę, czy tego chcesz, czy nie.

2. Because – ponieważ, bo, dlatego, że

Przed because nie stawiamy przecinka:

I am excited because I got into university! – Jestem podekscytowana, ponieważ dostałam się na uniwersytet! I listen because you speak. – Słucham, ponieważ ty mówisz.

Samo użycie because jako odpowiedź na pytanie może oznaczać Bo tak lub Bo nie. Jednak, tak jak jego polskie odpowiedniki, użycie go w takim kontekście jest nieformalne i dość niegrzeczne:

Why did you do this? – Because. – Dlaczego to zrobiłeś? – Bo tak.

3. Or – Lub, czy, albo

Do you want this apple or that one? – Chcesz to jabłko czy tamto?

Are you a vegetarian or not. – Jesteś wegetarianinem/wegetarianką czy nie.

4. But – lecz, ale, tylko, a, tylko że, jednak, jednakże, oprócz

Przed but nie stawiamy przecinka:

I like tea but I love coffee. – Lubię herbatę, ale/lecz kawę uwielbiam.

We wanted to go swimming but it was too cold. – Chcieliśmy popływać, ale/lecz było zbyt zimno.

She loves nobody but herself. – Nie kocha nikogo oprócz siebie.

But przed wykrzyknieniem może znaczyć ale, ależ:

But it wasn’t me! – Ale to nie byłem ja!

5. When – kiedy, gdy, jak, w czasie gdy/kiedy, podczas gdy/kiedy, wtedy kiedy/gdy

When did you meet? – Kiedy się spotkaliście?

When it rains, we read books. – Kiedy/gdy/jak pada, czytamy książki.

W zdaniach podrzędnych I warunkowych, po when, tak samo jak po if, nie używa się czasu przyszłego z użyciem will, aby odnieść się do przyszłości:

Call me when you get there. – Zadzwoń do mnie kiedy/jak tam dotrzesz.

6. While – kiedy, gdy, podczas kiedy/gdy, w czasie kiedy/gdy, wtedy kiedy/gdy, jak, dopóki

While używa się, aby podkreślić równoległość dwóch czynności w czasie:

I read while I eat. – Czytam kiedy/jak/gdy jem.

I love to sing while I’m driving. – Kocham śpiewać kiedy/gdy/wtedy gdy jadę samochodem.

While jest używane również dla zaznaczenia pewnej różnicy. Wtedy tłumaczy się to jako podczas gdy, gdy, a, natomiast:

He likes cats while she likes dogs. – On lubi koty, podczas gdy ona lubi psy.

I love her while she loves him. – Ja kocham ją podczas gdy/a/natomiast ona kocha jego.

7. Wheneverkiedykolwiek, kiedy tylko, gdy tylko, jeśli tylko, kiedy, gdy, ilekroć

Whenever tłumaczy się zazwyczaj jako kiedykolwiek, kiedy tylko:

Call me whenever you want. – Zadzwoń do mnie kiedykolwiek/kiedy tylko chcesz.

Whenever he speaks, she listens. – Kiedy tylko/ilekroć on mówi, ona słucha.

W znaczeniu zawsze, kiedy używa się always when:

Why is it always when I’m with you… until Superman appears? And then you seem to disappear. – Dlaczego zawsze, gdy przebywam z tobą... i pojawia się Superman, a ty znikasz.

All I know is everything went sideways, as always when you’re around. – Wiem tylko, że wszystko poszło nie tak, jak zawsze, kiedy się pojawiasz.

8. That – że / to, że / o tym, że

Pierwsze znaczenie that to że, które łączy zdania nadrzędne z podrzędnym:

Tell her that we love her. – Powiedz jej, że ją kochamy. You know that I love dogs. – Wiesz, że kocham psy.

który / którego / która / którą / które

Drugie znaczenie that to wprowadzenie zdań względnych (relative clauses), czyli dokładniejszego opisu osoby lub przedmiotu:

The dress that I want is red. – Sukienka, którą chcę, jest czerwona.

We bought him the painting that he wanted. – Kupiliśmy mu (ten) obraz, który chciał.

That jest również zaimkiem wskazującym, oznaczającym tamto, o którym jest lekcja Określniki.

Data i czas updated 2019-12-22

Przedimki przed nazwami okresów czasu: pór roku, miesięcy, dni tygodnia i świąt.

I. Z reguły przed tymi nazwami nie stawiamy przedimków (tzw. zaimek zerowy ∅), zwłaszcza gdy są one poprzedzone jakimś przyimkiem, np.:

  • ∅ December, ∅ January, and ∅ February are winter months. Grudzień, styczeń i luty są miesiącami zimowymi.

  • See you ∅ Tuesday, goodbye! Zobaczymy się we wtorek, do widzenia!

  • I like ∅ autumn the most. Najbardziej lubię jesień.

  • It is usually hot in ∅ summer and cold in ∅ winter. Latem jest zazwyczaj gorąco, a zimą zimno.

  • We usually meet our whole family at ∅ Christmas. Zazwyczaj spotykamy całą naszą rodzinę w święta Bożego Narodzenia.

II. Jednak stawiamy przedimki w następujących przypadkach:

A) Przedimek nieokreślony a lub an stawiamy:

a. kiedy nazwy te są opisane poprzedzającym je przymiotnikiem, np.:

-- It was a bitter, cold winter. To była dotkliwa, mroźna zima.

Uwaga: na ogół nie używamy a/an przed przymiotnikami opisowymi early = wczesny i late = późny w sensie części tej pory roku, czy miesiąca:

-- We met in ∅ late November. Spotkaliśmy się pod koniec listopada.

-- It is ∅ early spring now. Teraz jest początek wiosny.

chyba że mamy na myśli nadzwyczaj wczesną wiosnę:

-- We had an early spring. Mieliśmy wczesną wiosnę.

b. kiedy mamy na myśli jeden z wielu takich okresów czasu, np.

-- Robinson Crusoe found his servant on a Friday. Robinson Crusoe znalazł swojego sługę pewnego piątku.

B) Przedimek określony the stawiamy:

a. kiedy nazwy te są zmodyfikowane przez szczegółowy opis, np.:

-- The summer of 1975 was unusually hot. Lato 1975 roku było niezwykle upalne.

-- I remember the Sunday we met. Pamiętam tę niedzielę, w którą się spotkaliśmy.

b. gdy opisana sytuacja je określa (=ten/tamten):

-- In March came the first break in the winter. W marcu przyszło pierwsze przełamanie zimy.

Czas przeszły 2 updated 2020-12-15

Pytania i przeczenia w Czasie Przeszłym Prostym

Pytania i przeczenia w Czasie Przeszłym Prostym = The Past Simple dla ogromnej większości czasowników tworzymy przy pomocy czasownika posiłkowego to do = robić.

Czas przeszły prosty od to do we wszystkich osobach ma formę did.

Ależ to proste! Po polsku mamy inną formę dla każdej osoby i rodzaju: zrobiłem, zrobiłam, zrobiłeś, zrobił, zrobiła, zrobiło, zrobiliśmy, zrobiłyśmy, itd. Popatrz, ile wysiłku właśnie ci zaoszczędziliśmy! Ha ha!

polski zaimek angielski zaimek Cz. przeszły (do)
ja/ty/on/ona/ono I/you/he/she/it did
my/wy/oni/one we/you/they/they did

Przykładowe zdanie w czasie przeszłym:

I heard you. - Słyszałem cię.

Przeczenie tworzymy zaprzeczając tylko czasownik posiłkowy, czyli did, wstawiając did not pomiędzy podmiot I = ja a czasownik główny hear, który pozostaje wtedy w formie podstawowej, jak w czasie teraźniejszym.

I did not hear you. - Nie słyszałem cię.

Pytanie w czasie przeszłym tworzymy wstawiając czasownik posiłkowy did przed podmiot, zostawiając czasownik główny w formie podstawowej.

Did I hear you?Czy ja cię słyszałem?

Natomiast pytanie przeczące łączy obie te konstrukcje:

Did I not hear you?Czy ja cię nie słyszałem?

Tej konstrukcji nie stosuje się do czasownika to be - być, który ma własną odmianę nieregularną przez osoby.

Pytania i przeczenia w Czasie Przeszłym Prostym dla "to be" = być

polski angielski Cz. przeszły (be)
ja/on/ona/ono I/he/she/it was
ty/wy/my/oni you/you/we/they were

Też bardzo proste! Tylko dwie formy. Po polsku mamy co innego dla każdej osoby i rodzaju!

Czas teraźniejszy:

I am a student. - Jestem uczniem.

Czas przeszły:

I was a student. - Byłem uczniem.

Pytanie:

Was I a student?Czy byłem uczniem?

Przeczenie:

I was not a student. - Nie byłem uczniem

Pytanie przeczące:

Was I not a student?Czy nie byłem uczniem?

Jest jeszcze kilka innych czasowników (tzw. modalnych), które również nie stosują to be jako czasownika posiłkowego. Będziemy się o nich uczyć później.

c.d.n.

Rzeczowniki odsłowne updated 2021-03-18

https://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/courses/elc/sample/beginner/gs/gs_25_1.htm

Czas przyszły złożony updated 2019-01-02

Czas przyszły złożony

Innymi słowy: konstrukcja czasu przyszłego z wyrażeniem to be going to.

1. Budowa zdania

1.1. Zdanie twierdzące

Budowa zdania:

podmiot + czasownik to be w czasie Simple Present odmieniany przez osoby + going to + czasownik główny w formie podstawowej, tj. nieodmieniany.

podmiot + czas. posiłkowy czasownik główny
I am
You are
He is
She is + going to + czasownik w bezokoliczniku
It is
We are
You are
They are

Przykład:

  • She is going to wait for us. - Ona zamierza na nas poczekać.

1.2. Zdanie przeczące

Budowa zdania:

podmiot + czasownik to be w czasie Simple Present odmieniany przez osoby + przeczenie not + going to + czasownik główny w formime podstawowej, tj. nieodmieniany.

podmiot + czas. posiłkowy przeczenie i czasownik główny
I am
You are
He is
She is + not going to + czasownik w bezokoliczniku
It is
We are
You are
They are

Przykład:

  • They are not going to come here anymore. - Nie zamierzają tu więcej przychodzić.

Możemy stosować formy skrócone, np.: She’s going to, We aren’t going to.

1.3. Pytania ogólne

W pytaniach ogólnych, czyli pytaniach na które można odpowiedzieć "tak" lub "nie", należy zastosować inwersję, to znaczy na początku zdania podmiot zamienia się miejscami z czasownikiem posiłkowym to be. Budowa zdania jest zatem następująca:

czasownik to be odmieniany przez osoby + podmiot + going to + czasownik główny w formie podstawowej.

czas. posiłkowy + podmiot czasownik główny
Am I
Are you
Is he
Is she + going to + czasownik w bezokoliczniku
Is it
Are we
Are you
Are they

Przykład:

  • Are you going to help your sister? - Czy zamierzasz pomóc swojej siostrze?
  • Are you going to swim today? - Czy będziesz dziś pływać?

1.4. Pytania szczegółowe

W pytaniach szczegółowych, czyli takich na które należy udzielić rozwiniętej odpowiedzi, stosujemy taką samą formę wypowiedzi jak w pytaniu ogólnym, z tym że trzeba je poprzedzić odpowiednim zaimkiem pytającym:

zaimek pytający + czasownik to be odmieniany przez osoby + podmiot + going to + czasownik główny w formie podstawowej.

Zaimki pytające:

  • why - dlaczego?
  • where - gdzie? dokąd?
  • when - kiedy?
zaimek pytający czas. posiłkowy + podmiot czasownik główny
Am I
Are you
Why Is he
Where Is she + going to + czasownik w bezokoliczniku
When Is it
Are we
Are you
Are they

Przykład:

  • Who are they going to visit? - Kogo zamierzają odwiedzić?

2. Użycie.

2.1. Intencje i zamiary

Gdy mowa o intencjach i zamierzeniach, wyrażenia to be going to tłumaczymy na język polski jako: zamierzać, mieć zamiar.

  • We are not going to eat this porridge! - Nie zamierzamy jeść tej owsianki!
  • Are your parents going to send you abroad? - Czy rodzice zamierzają wysłać cię za granicę?

2.2. Zaplanowane czynności

Mówiąc o planach, można to be going to tłumaczyć na czas przyszły prosty lub zastosować czasowniki zamierzać, mieć zamiar, planować - zależnie od kontekstu. W tego typu zdaniach to be going to wskazuje na intencję, coś, co zostało wcześniej przemyślane i jest postanowione, a nawet podjęto już pewne kroki w celu realizacji tego zamiaru. Może to również oznaczać cudze plany wobec podmiotu zdania.

  • I am going to take part in the competition. - Wezmę udział w zawodach LUB Zamierzam wziąć udział w zawodach, zależnie od kontekstu.
  • Why are you going to do that?! - Dlaczego planujesz to zrobić?!
  • The dog is going to be in the garden. - Pies będzie w ogrodzie - nie dlatego że pies "zamierza" być w ogrodzie, tylko tak postanowił jego właściciel, a więc w tym wypadku tłumaczenie "pies zamierza być w ogrodzie" nie oddaje sensu angielskiego zdania.

2.3. Przewidywania konsekwencji pewnych sytuacji

Wyrażenie to be going to służy do mówienia o czymś, co przewidujemy na podstawie widocznej przesłanki:

  • Look at the clouds, it is going to rain. - Spójrz na chmury: będzie padało.
  • He is running the best lap in the race, he is going to win! - On biegnie najlepsze okrążenie w wyścigu- wygra!

W tym przypadku – kiedy mówimy o przewidywaniach - to be going to możemy tłumaczyć na polski czas przyszły, mówiąc, że coś się stanie.

Różnica między "going to" a Future Simple:

  • I am going to take part in the competition. - Zamierzam wziąć udział w zawodach, to już postanowione, może już nawet wysłałem swoje zgłoszenie.
  • I will take part in the competition. - Zamierzam wziąć udział w zawodach, właśnie mi to przyszło do głowy.

Różnica między "going to" a Present Continuous w odniesieniu do przyszłości:

  • I am going to buy a new car this week. - Postanowiłem, że kupię w tym tygodniu nowy samochód. Ale jeśli nie znajdę modelu który mi się podoba, to jeszcze poczekam i kupię nieco później.
  • I am buying a new car tomorrow. - Jutro kupuję nowy samochód. Wszystko już jest załatwione i tylko muszę go odebrać.

Czas przyszły dokonany updated 2020-11-02

Czas przyszły dokonany (Future Perfect), zwany też czasem zaprzyszłym

Po co?

Czasu tego używamy, by określić czynności, które

I. zakończą się w przyszłości

a) przed konkretnie określonym punktem w czasie, np.:

  • I will have returned by December. – Wrócę przed grudniem.

b) przed rozpoczęciem innej czynności, np.:

  • He will have received the e-mail by the time he leaves. – On otrzyma e-mail, zanim wyjdzie.

II. przypuszczamy, że się już wydarzyły. np.:

  • She will have left her office by now. – Ona zapewne wyszła z biura do tej pory.

Jak?

Tworząc zdania w tym czasie, stosujemy następującą konstrukcję:

  • (podmiot) + will have + Past Participle (czasownik główny w trzeciej formie)

Przykłady

I. dla czynności, które zakończą się w przyszłości:

  • I will have written it by tomorrow. – Napiszę to do jutra (dosłownie: "Będę miał napisane to do jutra")

  • We will have eaten breakfast by the time you get up. – Zjemy śniadanie, zanim wstaniesz. (dosłownie: "Będziemy mieli zjedzone śniadanie, zanim wstaniesz")

Uwaga 1: Nie zawsze da się tak łatwo przetłumaczyć dosłownie, np.

  • We will have left before you arrive*. – Wyjdziemy, zanim przybędziesz.

Uwaga 2: Akcja czynności, która następuje musi być wyrażona w czasie teraźniejszym prostym (np. you get up), a nie przyszłym, jak po polsku (wstaniesz).

Uwaga 3: Punkt w przyszłości jest niezależny od obecnej pozycji w czasie, więc nie można użyć, np. za dwa miesiące.

Uwaga 4: W pierwszej osobie (I, we) czasownik posiłkowy will może być zastąpiony przez shall.

II. dla przypuszczenia, że coś się już wydarzyło (drugiego zastosowanie czasu Future Perfect):

  • You will have seen on page 18 how to set up a computer. Zapewne zobaczyliście na stronie 18-ej, jak ustawić komputer. Czytasz to w tej samej książce, ale na trochę późniejszej stronie, np. na str. 25.

  • Your mother will have left the dentist's by now. Twoja matka pewnie wyszła od dentysty do tej pory.

  • At this stage, everyone will have heard the rumors already. W tym momencie wszyscy już pewno usłyszeli plotki.

Wyrażamy tu teraźniejsze, niesprawdzone przypuszczenia o wydarzeniach w niedawnej przeszłości (present predictions of past actions).

To użycie Future Perfect wymaga oczywistego odnośnika do teraźniejszości, np. by now (do tej pory). Konstrukcja czasu jest zawsze taka sama: podmiot lub zaimek osobowy (ja, ty, on, ona, ono, my, wy, oni) **will have + (verb’s Past pParticiple) ... by now`.

W tłumaczeniu musimy wyrazić przypuszczenie, np. zapewne, pewnie, pewno, prawdopodobnie, itp. i użyć polskiego czasu przeszłego w aspekcie dokonanym.

Przykłady według wydawnictwa Farlex International 2016 - Complete English Grammar Rules, p.366.

Czasowniki modalne updated 2020-01-18

Czasowniki modalne

Źródło: http://www.angielski.nauczaj.com/konstrukcje-gramatyczne/czasowniki-modalne.php

Czasowniki modalne to odrębna grupa czasowników, które w zdaniu występują zawsze przed czasownikiem głównym. Występują one zawsze w tej samej formie. Zdania pytające z czasownikiem modalnym tworzy się poprzez inwersję, a przeczenia – dodając do czasownika modalnego słówko „not”. Najważniejsze czasowniki modalne:

Can – oznacza możliwość lub umiejętność wykonania danej czynności. Odnosi się do teraźniejszości i przyszłości. Ma też znaczenie zezwolenia, służy ponadto do wyrażania propozycji i próśb. Np.: He can jump very high. – On potrafi skakać bardzo wysoko.

Could – oznacza możliwość lub umiejętność posiadaną w przeszłości. Stosowany również do pytań o pozwolenie, próśb, bardziej grzeczny niż „can”. Np.: He could run very fast when he was young. – On potrafił bardzo szybko biegać, kiedy był młody.

May – oznacza zezwolenie, jest to forma bardziej oficjalna. Występuje w czasie teraźniejszym. Np.: They may leave this place now. – Oni mogą opuścić teraz to miejsce.

Might – oznacza zezwolenie, stosowane w czasie przeszłym. Używa się też do wyrażenia grzecznej prośby. Np. He might go to the disco yesterday. – On mógł iść wczoraj do dyskoteki.

Must – oznacza konieczność, przymus zrobienia czegoś. Posiada tylko formę czasu teraźniejszego, występuje wyłącznie w zdaniach oznajmujących. Np.: John must work very hard. – Jan musi pracować bardzo ciężko.

Have to – oznacza konieczność, przymus zrobienia czegoś, występuje we wszystkich czasach gramatycznych, zarówno z zdaniach oznajmujących, jak i twierdzących i pytających. Np.: He has to study very hard if he wants to pass this exam. – On musi dużo się uczyć, jeśli chce zdać ten egzamin.

Mustn’t – oznacza silny zakaz. Odnosi się do teraźniejszości i przyszłości. Np.: You mustn’t drink alkohol. – Nie wolno ci pić alkoholu.

Shall – stosuje się do wyrażania próśb, ofert lub sugestii. Np.: Shall we go to the party tomorrow? –Czy pójdziemy jutro na przyjęcie?

Should – oznacza powinność, obowiązek zrobienia czegoś. Służy również do udzielania rad, pytania o radę, tworzenia trybu warunkowego oraz mowy zależnej. Np.: You should eat more fruit. – Powinieneś jeść więcej owoców.

Ought to – oznacza konieczność, obowiązek zrobienia czegoś, stosowany w sytuacjach bardziej oficjalnych. Np.: He ought to study more. – On powinien więcej się uczyć.

Will – stosowany do tworzenia czasów przyszłych oraz do wyrażenia próśb. Np.: Will you open the window, please? – Czy otworzysz okno, proszę?

Would – służy do tworzenia trybu warunkowego, mowy zależnej, do wyrażania próśb w sytuacjach bardziej oficjalnych oraz do wyrażania przypuszczenia. Np.: I would lend you some money if I had. – Pożyczyłbym ci trochę pieniędzy, gdybym je miał.

Need – oznacza konieczność, potrzebę zrobienia czegoś. Np.: I need go to the dentist because I have toothache. – Muszę iść do dentysty, ponieważ boli mnie ząb.

Needn’t – oznacza brak konieczności. Może być stosowany zamiennie z czasownikami don’t have to oraz don’t need to. Np.: Mary needn’t (doesn’t have to / doesn’t need to) go by bus because her boyfriend has got a car. – Mary nie musi jechać autobusem, ponieważ jej chłopak ma samochód.

Had better – służy do wyrażania rad. Np.: You had better go to bed and rest. – Lepiej idź do łóżka i wypocznij.

Be able to – być w stanie coś zrobić Np.: She will be able to explain that. – Ona będzie w stanie to wyjaśnić.


14 skills with tips and notes

 
4.682